Friday, December 23, 2016

Bridge Stem Program - Museum of Natural History

Our Brown Scholars program is a new 3-year intensive focused on the intersection of computer science and science. It is tuition-free thanks to a generous grant from the Helen Gurley Brown Trust.
The program has 3 components:
1) 120 hours of coursework across 3 classes: Intro to Programming, Intro to Databases, Intro to Data Visualization
  • The coursework is offered in an after-school format: two afternoons a week, 4:30-6:30 pm, October - June OR in a summer format: 5 days a week, 10 am - 4 pm for 6 weeks (July - August)
Girls who successfully complete the 120 hours of coursework are eligible for the second component:
2) a 9-month paid internship in either computational research or applied computer programming within a division at AMNH.
  • Interns will work on a team of 2-3 Brown Scholars under the mentorship of a post-bacc Helen Fellow.
  • Internships run two afternoons a week, 4:30 - 6:30 pm, September - May and culminate with presentations in the Spring.
Girls who successfully complete the internship are eligible for the third component:
3) college and career colloquium:  a series of field trips and workshops focused on the varied academic and professional opportunities in the world of computer science.
  • Field trips and workshops will be held twice a month on Friday afternoons, September - May.


Frequently Asked Questions:
Who is the Brown Scholars program for?
Girls may complete coursework during their 9th or 10th grade year OR the summer following their 9th or 10th grade year. We are unable to make exceptions to this grade requirement.
What material does the coursework cover?
You will learn to code in Python, work on real scientific data sets, and learn how data science and data visualization are important tools for scientists in all fields. You will learn about algorithms and databases while digging deep into astrophysics, biology, anthropology, and more. No coding experience necessary - we'll start from the beginning!
How do I apply?
The application process includes:  an online application including short essay questions, one letter of recommendation from a teacher or adult, a copy of your most recent transcript/report card.
Selected applicants will be invited in for an in-person interview.  Final admission decisions will be made following the interviews.
This program is incredibly competitive, and we are unable to accept all qualified applicants.
I don’t live in New York City. Can I still apply?
The Brown Scholars program is only available for students in the greater NYC area. You do not need to attend an NYC public school to apply, but you must be able to attend classes in person. Priority is given to students who are interested and able to complete all 3 components of the program.   
I’m interested in the Brown Scholars Program and SRMP at AMNH. Can I apply to both?
Students who are accepted to the Brown Scholars Program are NOT eligible to apply for After School Program Research Courses (which are prerequisites for the Science Research Mentoring Program). Students are, however, eligible to apply for ASP Exploratory courses.
Still have questions?
Email bridgeup@amnh.org

Friday, October 28, 2016

Columbia University Supplementary materials for the Common App

Kweller Suggests:Don't want until senior year to assemble this! plan from grade 9!


Hint: File should be under 500 KB and one of these types: .pdf .doc .docx .rtf .txt.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

English book list for advanced students

Recommended Reading for AP Literature & Composition
Titles from Free Response Questions* Adapted from an original list by Norma J. Wilkerson. Works referred to on the AP Literature exams since 1971 (specific years in parentheses).
A Absalom, Absalom by William Faulkner (76, 00) Adam Bede by George Eliot (06) The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (80, 82, 85, 91, 92, 94, 95, 96, 99, 05, 06, 07, 08) The Aeneid by Virgil (06) Agnes of God by John Pielmeier (00) The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton (97, 02, 03, 08) Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood (00, 04, 08) All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren (00, 02, 04, 07, 08) All My Sons by Arthur Miller (85, 90) All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy (95, 96, 06, 07, 08) America is in the Heart by Carlos Bulosan (95) An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser (81, 82, 95, 03) The American by Henry James (05, 07) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (80, 91, 99, 03, 04, 06, 08) Another Country by James Baldwin (95) Antigone by Sophocles (79, 80, 90, 94, 99, 03, 05) Anthony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare (80, 91) Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (94) Armies of the Night by Norman Mailer (76) As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner (78, 89, 90, 94, 01, 04, 06, 07) As You Like It by William Shakespeare (92 05. 06) Atonement by Ian McEwan (07) Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man by James Weldon Johnson (02, 05) The Awakening by Kate Chopin (87, 88, 91, 92, 95, 97, 99, 02, 04, 07)
B "The Bear" by William Faulkner (94, 06) Beloved by Toni Morrison (90, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07) A Bend in the River by V. S. Naipaul (03) Benito Cereno by Herman Melville (89) Billy Budd by Herman Melville (79, 81, 82, 83, 85, 99, 02, 04, 05, 07, 08) The Birthday Party by Harold Pinter (89, 97) Black Boy by Richard Wright (06, 08)
Bleak House by Charles Dickens (94, 00, 04) Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya (94, 96, 97, 99, 04, 05, 06, 08) The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood (07) The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison (95, 08) Bone: A Novel by Fae M. Ng (03) The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan (06, 07) Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (89, 05) Brighton Rock by Graham Greene (79) The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevski (90, 08)
C Candida by George Bernard Shaw (80) Candide by Voltaire (80, 86, 87, 91, 95, 96, 04, 06) The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (06) The Caretaker by Harold Pinter (85) Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (82, 85, 87, 89, 94, 01, 03, 04, 05, 07, 08) The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (01, 08) Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams (00) Cat's Eye by Margaret Atwood (94, 08) The Centaur by John Updike (81) Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko (94, 96, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 06, 07) The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov (71, 77, 06, 07) The Chosen by Chaim Potok (08) "Civil Disobedience" by Henry David Thoreau (76) Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier (06, 08) The Color Purple by Alice Walker (92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 05, 08) Coming Through Slaughter by Michael Ondaatje (01) Cry, The Beloved Country by Alan Paton (85, 87, 91, 95, 96, 07) Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevski (76, 79, 80, 82, 88, 96, 99, 00, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05) "The Crisis" by Thomas Paine (76) The Crucible by Arthur Miller (71, 83, 86, 89, 04, 05)
D Daisy Miller by Henry James (97, 03) Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel (01) David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (78, 83, 06) "The Dead" by James Joyce (97) The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy (86) Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller (86, 88, 94, 03, 04, 05, 07) Delta Wedding by Eudora Welty (97) Desire under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill (81) Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler (97) The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (06)
The Diviners by Margaret Laurence (95) Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe (79, 86, 99, 04) A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen (71, 83, 87, 88, 95, 05) The Dollmaker by Harriet Arnot (91) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes (01, 04, 06, 08) Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia (03) Dutchman by Amiri Baraka/Leroi Jones (03, 06)
E East of Eden by John Steinbeck (06) Emma by Jane Austen (96, 08) An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen (76, 80, 87, 99, 01, 07) Equus by Peter Shaffer (92, 99, 00, 01, 08) Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton (80, 85, 03, 05, 06, 07) The Eumenides by Aeschylus (in The Orestia) (96)
F The Fall by Albert Camus (81) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (99, 04) The Father by August Strindberg (01) Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev (90) Faust by Johann Goethe (02, 03) The Federalist by Alexander Hamilton (76) Fences by August Wilson (02, 03, 05) A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry (03) Fifth Business by Robertson Davis (00, 07) The Fixer by Bernard Malamud (07) For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway (03, 06) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (89, 00, 03, 06, 08)
G A Gathering of Old Men by Ernest Gaines (00) A Gesture Life by Chang-Rae Lee (04, 05) Ghosts by Henrik Ibsen (00, 04) The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams (71, 90, 94, 97, 99, 02, 08) Going After Cacciato by Tim O'Brien (01, 06) The Good Soldier by Ford Maddox Ford (00) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (95, 03, 06) Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (79, 80, 88, 89, 92, 95, 96, 00, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 07, 08) The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (82, 83, 88, 91, 92, 97, 00, 02, 04, 05, 07) Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin (83, 88, 90, 05) Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift (87, 89, 01, 04, 06)
H
The Hairy Ape by Eugene O'Neill (89) Hamlet by William Shakespeare (88, 94, 97, 99, 00) The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (03) Hard Times by Charles Dickens (87, 90) Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (71, 76, 91, 94, 96, 99, 00, 01, 02, 03, 04, 06) The Heart of the Matter by Graham Greene (71) Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen (79, 92, 00, 02, 03, 05) Henry IV, Parts I and II by William Shakespeare (80, 90, 08) Henry V by William Shakespeare (02) A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes (08) The Homecoming by Harold Pinter (78, 90) House Made of Dawn by N Scott Momaday (95, 06) The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (04, 07) The House of Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne (89) The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros (08)
I The Iliad by Homer (80) The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (06) In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O'Brien (00) In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez (05) Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (76, 77, 78, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 91, 94, 95, 96, 97, 01, 03, 04, 05, 07, 08)
J Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (78, 79, 80, 88, 91, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 00, 05, 07, 08) Jasmine by Bharati Mukherjee (99) J.B. by Archibald MacLeish (81, 94) Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson (00, 04) The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan (97, 03) Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding (99) Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy (71, 76, 80, 85, 87, 95, 04) Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (82, 97, 05, 07) The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (77, 78, 82, 88, 89, 90, 96)
K Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami (08) King Lear by William Shakespeare (77, 78, 82, 88, 89, 90, 96, 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseinii (07, 08)
L A Lesson before Dying by Ernest Gaines (99) Letters from an American Farmer by de Crevecoeur (76) Light in August by William Faulkner (71, 79, 81, 82, 83, 85, 95, 99, 03, 06) The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman (85, 90)
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (08) Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O'Neill (90, 03, 07) Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad (77, 78, 82, 86, 00, 03, 07) Lord of the Flies by William Golding (85, 08) The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh (89) Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich (95) "Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot (85) Lysistrata by Aristophanes (87)
M Macbeth by William Shakespeare (83, 99, 03, 05) Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (80, 85, 04, 05, 06) Main Street by Sinclair Lewis (87) Major Barbara by George Bernard Shaw (79, 96, 04, 07) Man and Superman by George Bernard Shaw (81) Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (03, 06) Master Harold...and the Boys by Athol Fugard (03, 08) The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy (94, 99, 00, 02, 07) M. Butterfly by David Henry Wang (95) Medea by Euripides (82, 92, 95, 01, 03) The Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers (97, 08) The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare (85, 91, 95, 02, 03) Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (78, 89) Middlemarch by George Eliot (95, 04, 05, 07) Middle Passage by V. S. Naipaul (06) A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare (06) The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (90, 92, 04) The Misanthrope by Moliere (08) Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathanael West (89) Moby Dick by Herman Melville (76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 89, 94, 96, 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07) Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe (76, 77, 86, 87, 95) Monkey Bridge by Lan Cao (00, 03) The Moor's Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie (07) Mother Courage and Her Children by Berthold Brecht (85, 87, 06) Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (94, 97, 04, 05, 07) Mrs. Warren's Profession by George Bernard Shaw (87, 90, 95, 02) Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare (97) Murder in the Cathedral by T. S. Eliot (76, 80, 85, 95, 07) "My Last Duchess" by Robert Browning (85) My Antonia by Willa Cather (03, 08) My Name is Asher Lev by Chaim Potok (03)
N Native Son by Richard Wright (79, 82, 85, 87, 95, 01, 04)
Native Speaker by Chang-Rae Lee (99, 03, 05, 07, 08) 1984 by George Orwell (87, 94, 05) No Exit by John Paul Sartre (86) No-No Boy by John Okada (95) Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevski (89)
O Obasan by Joy Kogawa (94, 95, 04, 05, 06, 07) The Odyssey by Homer (86, 06) Oedipus Rex by Sophocles (77, 85, 88, 00, 03, 04) Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (01) Old School by Tobia Wolff (08) One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn (05) One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (89, 04) One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (01) O Pioneers! by Willa Cather (06) The Optimist's Daughter by D. H. Lawrence (94) The Orestia by Aeschylus (90) Orlando: A Biography by Virginia Woolf (04) Othello by William Shakespeare (79, 85, 88, 92, 95, 03. 04, 07) Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens (90) Our Town by Thornton Wilder (86, 97) Out of Africa by Isaak Dinesen (06)
P Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov (01) Pamela by Samuel Richardson (86) A Passage to India by E. M. Forster (71, 77, 78, 88, 91, 92, 07) Paradise Lost by John Milton (85, 86) Peer Gynt by Henrik Ibsen (06) Père Goriot by Honore de Balzac (02) Persuasion by Jane Austen (90, 05, 07) Phaedre by Jean Racine (92, 03) The Piano Lesson by August Wilson (96, 99, 07, 08) The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (02) The Plague by Albert Camus (02) Pnin by Vladimir Nabokov (97) Pocho by Jose Antonio Villarreal (02, 08) Portrait of a Lady by Henry James ( 88, 92, 96, 03, 05, 07) Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce (76, 77, 80, 86, 88, 96, 99, 04, 05, 08) The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene (95) Praisesong for the Widow by Paule Marshall (96) Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (83, 88, 92, 97, 08)
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark (90, 08) Push by Sapphire (07) Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw (03, 05, 08)
R Ragtime by E. L. Doctorow (03, 07) A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry (87, 90, 94, 96, 99, 07) The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope (81) The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane (08) Redburn by Herman Melville (87) The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro (00, 03) Reservation Blues by Sherman Alexie (08) The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy (07) Richard III by William Shakespeare (79) A River Runs Through It by Norman Maclean (08) A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf (76) A Room with a View by E. M. Forster (03) Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (90, 92, 97, 08) Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard (81, 94, 00, 04, 05, 06)
S Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw (95) The Sandbox by Edward Albee (1971) The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (71, 77, 78, 83, 88, 91, 99, 02, 04, 05, 06) Sent for You Yesterday by John Edgar Wideman (03) A Separate Peace by John Knowles (82, 07) The Shipping News by E. Annie Proulx (97) Silas Marner by George Eliot (02) Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser (87, 02, 04) Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut (91, 04) Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson (00) Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison (81, 88, 96, 00, 04, 05, 06, 07) Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence (77, 90) The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (77, 86, 97, 01, 07, 08) The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence (96, 04) The Stranger by Albert Camus (79, 82, 86, 04) A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams (91, 92, 01, 04, 07, 08) The Street by Ann Petry (07) Sula by Toni Morrison (92, 97, 02, 04, 07, 08) Surfacing by Margaret Atwood (05) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (85, 91, 95, 96, 04, 05)
T A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (82, 91, 04, 08) Tarftuffe by Moliere (87)
The Tempest by William Shakespeare (71,78, 96, 03, 05, 07) Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (82, 91, 03, 06, 07) Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zorah Neale Hurston (88, 90, 91, 96, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08) Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (91, 97, 03) The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien (04) A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley (06) To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (08) To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf (77, 86, 88, 08) Tom Jones by Henry Fielding (90, 00, 06, 08) Tracks by Louise Erdrich (05) The Trial by Franz Kafka (88, 89, 00) Trifles by Susan Glaspell (00) Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne (86) The Turn of the Screw by Henry James (92, 94, 00, 02, 04, 08) Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare (85, 94, 96) Typical American by Gish Jen (02, 03, 05)
U Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (87)
V The Vicar of Wakefield by Oliver Goldsmith (06) Victory by Joseph Conrad (83) Volpone by Ben Jonson (83)
W Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett (77, 85, 86, 89, 94, 01) The Warden by Anthony Trollope (96) Washington Square by Henry James (90) The Wasteland by T. S. Eliot (81) Watch on the Rhine by Lillian Hellman (87) The Way of the World by William Congreve (71) The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope (06) We Were the Mulvaneys by Joyce Carol Oates (07) Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee (88, 94, 00, 04, 07) Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (89, 92, 05, 07, 08) The Wild Duck by Henrik Ibsen (78) Winter in the Blood by James Welch (95) Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare (82, 89, 95, 06) Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor (82, 89, 95) Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston (91, 08) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (71,77, 78, 79, 83, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 96, 97, 99, 01, 06, 07, 08)
Z The Zoo Story by Edward Albee (82, 01) Zoot Suit by Luis Valdez (95)

Descriptive Essay Draft 2: My Ideal Profession:


Descriptive Essay Draft 2: My Ideal Profession:



While there are many professions one can choose from, I perhaps have a desire to pursue an atypical one. If given the opportunity to pursue any field of study, I see myself as videogame designer. I have been interested in this field since I was a child, and this is the ideal turf for me. In fact, I envision myself as a developer of advanced levels of games such as Rock Band," "Wii Fit" and "Madden Football." Thanks to my profession, people will line up to buy all the popular video games that I design. I will hear audiences of people cheer as I pass them by. Making video games requires a lot of imagination and I know that I will be able to bring my talent to life by pursuing this fascinating field.

I had my first taste of what it would be like to be a videogame designer in the second grade. My school teacher, Ms. Hanna, hosted career day for our class. Among the various speakers I encountered, the one who struck out the most was a videogame software developer. His field of study seemed so interesting—he was exactly what I wanted to be. Juxtaposed to him was a team of speakers – lawyers in stuffy dark suits and doctors in long white uncomfortable jackets. However, here amidst them was a designer in a solid grey t-shirt and jeans. He shared how he was making as much, if not more, than his tightly dressed counterparts. I wanted to be him.

As a professional videogame designer, I will have to devote myself to exploring every aspect of a game and to mastering its outcome. Videogame design is a challenging, booming business with many specialized jobs and numerous points of entry. Since I was very young, I have been passionate about this highly competitive field. I possess a variety of skills and innate abilities. The expertise largely involves training in computer graphics, animation and software design. These are areas I am extremely interested in and areas that I definitely want to study. I hope that, as a designer, I will obtain the training at credentialed programs at technical schools I will need to be successful in my career.



To summarize, I know that I will make an excellent videogame designer because I possess a very powerful imagination, which is a prerequisite in order to construct the alternative world of the game in one’s mind before creating it in cyberspace. Indubitably, I feel that, as a designer I can make a great impact in this field and bring design to life. 


Monday, September 19, 2016

2016 high school fairs

Kweller Suggests: DO NOT WAIT UNTIL 8th GRADE TO ATTEND SPECIALIZED HIGH SCHOOL  FAIRS!

YOU NEED EVERY MINUTE YOU HAVE TO STUDY FOR THE SHSAT. ATTEND HIGH SCHOOL FAIRS IN GRADE 7! This way you can plan your test prep schedule a solid year before the SHSAT TEST.


Brooklyn Technical High School  29 Fort Greene Place, 11217

Saturday, September 24, 2016  and  Sunday, September 25, 2016

10am–3pm 

Friday, September 16, 2016

Hunter 2016 syllabus

2016 HUNTER/ ANDERSON/ BACCALAUREATE
Weekend Syllabus

Course Dates/ Times:
14 classes total/ 6 hours each class
Every Saturday or Sunday
Start Date: Saturday September 10, 2016
End Date:  Sunday December 18, 2016
No Class: Thanksgiving Weekend
November 26 or 27, 2016
Session A: 8:00 am to 2:00 pm
Session B: 2:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Queens Location:
Parker Towers 104-40 Queens Blvd; Suite 1C
Forest Hills NY 11375 (Queens Blvd and 69 Avenue)

Manhattan Location:
370 Lexington Avenue; Suite 800
New York, NY 10017 (Lexington and 41 Street)

Objectives 
1.     Practice for the Hunter and Baccalaureate Entrance Exams
2.     Acquire advanced note-taking skills 
3.     Improve critical reading, writing, math, vocabulary and grammar  
4.     Memorize advanced vocabulary
5.     Master descriptive essay writing using vivid imagery

Materials Provided:
1.     Print Out: Hunter Practice Tests 1-14
2.     Print Out: Math Packet Weeks 1-14
3.     Print Out: Reading Packet Weeks 1-14
4.     Print Out: Vocabulary Packet Weeks 1-14
5.     Book: What High Schools Don’t Tell You and Other Parents Don’t Want You to Know
6.     Book: 50 Harvard Application Essays plus Commentary
7.     Laminated Sheets: Grammar and Math Quick Study Guides
8.     Materials: Pens, pencils, pencil case, highlighters, colored index cards, spiral homework notebooks, gel pens, glow-in-the dark #2 pencils, black note-taking paper, metallic markers, Kweller bags, snacks and refreshments.  


Hunter Entrance Exam Overview:

Go to  http://www.hunterschools.org/hs/entrance-exam. The HCHS admissions test is an English & Math based examination given to students in the 6th grade only to determine admission into Hunter High School for grades 7-12. In total, there are three locations at which the test is generally administered: HCHS at 94th St. between Park and Madison Avenues; Hunter College – West Building at 68th St. and Lexington Avenue; Hunter College – North Building at 69th St. between Park and Lexington Avenues. You have only ONE chance to be admitted into Hunter High School via an admissions exam. This is only ONCE, and admissions are only granted to students in the 7th grade. As stated on Hunter’s website, “It is given once per year, with no make-up dates or rescheduling.” We know this may not seem fair, but we didn’t make up the rules, so please don’t be mad at the messengers. Your child can take the test by invitation only. The cutoff scores for the 2016 Hunter College High School Entrance exam were 357 in MATH AND 346 in ELA. Students who achieve the highest scores on ELA & Math are “invited” to sit for the test. Your child must score in the 90th percentile on the ELA and on the Math state test to qualify. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you do not have ELA or Math State Scores, then you must submit your child’s school’s scores from the private school directly to Hunter. For example, your child must have scored in the 90th percentile in both math and in English on the Terra Nova exams or ERB’s. For private school students, the scores vary, but students must reach 90th percentile or higher in both math and in English. For UNIS students, Hunter will not accept MAP test scores, so you must take the Hunter qualifying exam, which is basically an old Terra Nova test, in November at Hunter. See the Kweller Prep website for more info on this. HCHS school is absolutely excellent, on the glitzy Upper East Side, and completely free, so competition is high and fierce. Students from all 5 boroughs of New York City will be competing for just a few select spots. It is one of the most selective public high schools in the United States. From 3,000 test-takers, about 175 are offered admission on the basis of the exam. Hunter College High School is consistently ranked as one of the top public high schools in the nation. Only about 6% of the students who take the Hunter High School exam get into the High School. This means that it is harder to get into Hunter High School than it is to get admitted into Harvard University, a school with an 8% admission rate. Each year, approximately 25% of HCHS students are accepted into Ivy League colleges (Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Brown and Dartmouth). Several more attend Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In 2006, HCHS reported a record high of a 60% acceptance rate into the Ivy Leagues– as if 25% was not impressive enough! Over 90% of Hunter grads matriculate to a top tier nationally-ranked college. The exam takes place mainly at Hunter High School, on the Upper East Side of New York City. The school’s address is 71 East 94th Street, New York, NY 10128.


Baccalaureate Entrance Exam Overview:

Go to http://www.bsge.org/. The Baccalaureate High School of Queens (“BSGE”) is one of the top schools in New York City, State, and the United States. Founded in 2002, BSGE was awarded the IB certificate in 2005, allowing its students to receive the highest recognized diploma in the world. Applicants to top universities are accepted at a higher rate with an IB Diploma, many on merit-based college scholarships. Many universities also offer academic credit for successful examination results and after receiving an IB Diploma. In fact, many IB Students enter college with college credits. The Baccalaureate School offers a Global Education where almost all students receive an IB (International Baccalaureate) diploma. The Baccalaureate High School is the only public IB school in New York State, providing the prestigious IB diploma, which is accepted anywhere in the world. Please note that another school, called the Brooklyn Latin School, is a Specialized High School, which also offers an IB diploma. However, almost all other IB schools in New York City are highly expensive private schools. The IBO (International Baccalaureate Organization) provides a certificate to schools that qualify to provide courses that are rigorous enough to meet their expectations. The IB diploma is the most prestigious diploma in the world, and it is accepted at any accredited college and/or university in the world. The IB exams offer internationally standardized courses and assessments for students ages 16 to 19. All students must produce a carefully researched 4,000-word essay and take a Theory of Knowledge College Level course while still in high school. There are two steps to be admitted to BSGE. The first requirement is to pass the Placement Exams, which consist of the following: reading comprehension (long reading passages and double passages), language arts (grammar and vocabulary in context), and mathematics (including 7 & 8th grade algebra!).  As of 2013, there has not been an essay component to the Baccalaureate Entrance Exam. For the entry point at 7th grade, your child must take the test in January of 6th grade. For the second entry point, in the 9th grade, your child must take the test in the 8th grade. Please note that it is easier to get admitted starting 7th grade than starting 9th grade.  At Kweller Prep, we encourage students to apply for 7th grade entry. This way, they are more familiar with the school and their classmates prior to starting high school in the 9th grade. The Baccalaureate High School of Queens is a completely free public school. The only entrance point is via testing followed by a group interview. Entrance points are in the 6th grade and in the 8th grade for 7th and 9th grade admission to the school. Tuition at private International Baccalaureate schools (like the Lycee Francais in Manhattan or the United Nations School “UNIS” in Queens and Manhattan) is as much as $40,000 each year, but this particular school is completely free. The school’s address is 34-12 36 Avenue. Long Island City, NY, 11106. The school’s phone number is: (718) 361-5275.

About the NEST Exam:
NEST+m is a Manhattan city-wide Gifted and Talented school.  All students must take the entrance exam to be considered for admission into the Middle Grades. Below is a list of entrance exam dates and admissions events for the 2015-16 school year. Students in Grade 5 take this test for 6th grade entry. The 6th Grade admissions process begins with the electronic registration for the NEST+m Admissions Exam. Electronic registration begins in January 2017 on the NEST+m web- site (www.nestmk12.net). On the day of the exam, please bring the following to the school in a manila folder to complete the admissions process.  (1) Copies of your child’s most recent report card, (2) Copies of the 4t­­­­h grade NYS Exam in ELA/ Math or ERB, (3) Copy of your child’s end of the year 4th grade report card, (4) Self-addressed stamped envelope. The nest exam testing is from February 2017 to March 2017. There are ANALOGIES and OLSAT-E (figural analogies, pattern matrices, figural analogies, logical reasoning, and arithmetic reasoning) type questions on the Nest Exam. The TACHS Ability section helps with the figural classifications. There are 1,750 students at PS 122. The school’s address is 111 Columbia Street, New York NY 10002. The phone number is (212) 677-5190.

About Mark Twain:

Mark Twain (IS 239) Brooklyn, New York is a Gifted and Talented middle school and is known as a “feeder” into the specialized high schools. Entrance exam are extremely competitive; in 2010, 6,355 students sought admission for 450 freshman seats. Students should start preparing early, ideally by the beginning of their 4th grade school year. For Mark Twain Entrance, expect to see approximately thirty questions consisting of complex, multi-step mathematical problem solving, puzzle and logic questions, and pattern recognition. A thorough knowledge of K–5 math is assumed but questions go well beyond Common Core standards. Also expect approximately twenty questions that ask applicants to demonstrate knowledge of basic computer skills and vocabulary, Internet fluency, and familiarity with current technology issues. Applicant must demonstrate reading comprehension of a technical document. And finally there are some questions that analyze “potential” programming ability featuring logical, sequential and iterative thinking. For the creative writing and journalism test, expect to see two parts. In Part One (40%), applicants answer 40 multiple choice questions on a variety of topics including reading comprehension, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary. In Part Two (60%), applicants write an original composition (choice of two topics) that will be evaluated on idea development, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, originality, creativity, writing mechanics and use of conventions.  Here are the impressive Fall 2016 Specialized HS Results for Mark Twain: LaGuardia- 93 students accepted (Vocal-16; Art- 31; Dance- 7; Instrumental- 24; Technical Theatre-8; Drama- 7) Brooklyn Technical HS- 88 students accepted; Stuyvesant-75 students accepted; Staten Island Technical HS- 25 Brooklyn Latin-16; High School for Math, Science and Engineering at the City College- 2. The School’s address is: 2401 Neptune Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11224. The phone number is (718) 266- 0814.

The Grade 5 Mark Twain Testing timeline is as follows:
·         Sept — Submit Request for Testing Mark Twain
·         Sept — Mark Twain application available
·         Early Oct — Mark Twain Open House
·         Oct — Application info & handouts (for download)
·         Nov/Dec — School Choice Applications deadline
·         Nov/Dec — Application deadline Mark Twain
·         Jan or Feb — Entrance Exam Mark Twain
·         May — Results from Mark Twain Entrance Exam
·         Admissions are based on exam score and school choice


About Q300:
The 30th Avenue School (“Q300”) is a Citywide Gifted and Talented school that admits students from any of the five boroughs of New York City and serves students in grades 6, 7 and 8. Students in grade 5 apply to this middle school. In 2015, 88% of the Q300 middle school students scored a 3 or 4 on the ELA and a solid 91% of the student body scored a 4/4, placing Q300 as one of the ten best middle schools in NYC and the highest in all of School District 30. There are only 115 students at this school in total. The school’s address is 28-37 29th St, Queens, NY 11102. Phone number is: (718) 626-8502300’
s middle school is located in Long Island City/Astoria, Queens at the IS 126
About Middle School Gifted and Talented Admissions:
·         35% NYS Test Scores from Grade 4 (ELA & Mathematics)
·         35% Report card grades (Grade 4 - ELA, social studies, mathematics, and science)
·         10% Attendance and Tardiness/Lateness
·         20% Academic Behaviors/ Teacher comments from Grade 4 report card
About P.S. 122:
P.S. 122 offers a Citywide Gifted and Talented Middle School, also known as the Academy for the Intellectually Gifted, is a district-wide Talented and Gifted program which aims to maximize the degree of academic acceleration while providing a diverse array of enrichment opportunities and an emphasis on the physical, social, and emotional well-being of the exceptional students. P.S. 122 provides a stimulating academic environment centered on students' interests. Academic content work incorporates many opportunities to engage in problem-based learning (PBL), interdisciplinary projects, and teacher as well as self/peer assessments. Additionally, students are well prepared for the academic requirements of New York City’s specialized high schools. Academic advancement opportunities include Regents classes in Earth Science and Integrated Algebra. Enrichment Classes include: Visual Art, Dance, Music (Instrumental and Vocal), Service Learning, Student Government and Civics Education.  Students will be selected based on ELA and Math Scores, attendance, lateness, and teacher comments regarding student work habits and behavior. P.S. 122’s address is: 2121 Ditmars Blvd, Astoria, NY 11105. Phone number: (718) 721-6410.
About Scholars Academy:

Scholars Academy is a college preparatory school (grades 6-12) where students wear school uniforms. There are has 1300 middle and high school students. Students complete all their Regents requirements by 10th grade and move on to advanced placement classes. Scholars boasts a 100% 4-year college acceptance rate. The school address is 3-20 Beach 104th St, Rockaway Park, NY 11694.

About TAG Middle School:
TAG is a hidden jewel within the citywide gifted and talented options. To apply, you need a recommendation letter from your 4th or 5th grade teacher and 4/4 ELA and 4/4 Math Scores.  In 2016, 80 kids applied. 4 were accepted for September 2016 5th grade entry. TAG also offers 6th and 7th grade entry. What’s good about TAG is that the school will let new students enter whenever other students leave the school. In 2016, TAG received a higher ranking than NEST+M middle school.  TAG administers its own exam and interview. Two people interview each student; the following year’s teacher (grade 6 teacher will interview a grade 5 student) and advisor/class counselor. The TAG test is 3-hours long (which is just as long as the Hunter test). TAG has a very diverse student body. Disclaimer:  Downside is that this school building is shared with other lower performing schools and students. Kweller suggests: see the school’s location for yourself before applying. The TAG 2016 (8-page!) application is on the Kweller website, so you can get an idea of what they are looking for.  Tag’s location is not ideal. The address is 240 East 109th Street, New York, NY 10029 and the phone number is: Tel. (212) 860-6003 ext. 1061

About The Brooklyn School of Inquiry:
Brooklyn School of Inquiry (also known as PS/IS 686), often referred to as BSI, serves students k-8. BSI is the only citywide Gifted and Talented (G&T) program in Brooklyn and one of five in all of New York City. G&T programs are provided for students identified as gifted and talented by assessments that are administered by the New York City Department of Education (DOE). For the program, students are selected solely based on test scores. To be eligible for placement to Citywide G&T programs, students have to score at or above the 97th percentile on the ELA and MATH assessments administered the year prior. The total number of students at BSI is 426. The school was founded in 2009. BSI’s address: is 50 Avenue P, Bensonhurst, NY 11204.  Phone number: (718) 621-5730
About East Side Middle School:
Getting into East Side Middle School is like winning the middle school lottery. This school, open to District 2 residents in Manhattan only, offers an outstanding, completely free, accelerated education along with numerous arts and technology programs for students in grades 6-8.  The School’s address is: 331 E 91st St, New York, NY 10128. Phone number: (212) 360-0114

Summer programs and testing opportunities
About the SCAT Exam:

Go to http://cty.jhu.edu/. The SCAT stands for “School and College Ability” test and is used to determine eligibility to the summer programs offered through Johns Hopkins University’s CTY “Center for Talented Youth” programs. These are the types of elite programs where Harvard and Yale professors send their own children for the summer (and I’ll send mine!). Your kid will have the opportunity to take real college classes years ahead of their peers, in a real college setting, on a real college campus, with real college professors. Scholarships and financial aid is available first come first serve, so the earlier your child tests, the better.  Your child can take the SCAT or Advanced SCAT at any time, at a local prometric test center (like 9525 Queens Blvd #11) and on a computer. The SCAT is basically an OLD SAT test (developed before 2004) with verbal analogies and columns/ quantitative comparisons for math. The Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth identifies and develops the talents of the most advanced learners worldwide. CTY offers summer programs, online courses, family academic programs, scholarships, and internships to gifted students. Its alumni include the co-founder of Google, CEO of Facebook, and top placers of national academic competitions. Kweller Prep recommends students participate in CTY the summer after grade 6, in person, not online (for obvious reasons). To qualify, your child must score at the 95th percentile or higher on a nationally standardized test and/or achieve advanced levels on state tests (ex. “distinguished” “honors” “gifted”), and/or be nominated by a parent. Talent Search accepts tests and subtests that measure mathematical and verbal reasoning ability. The Johns Hopkins CTY Scholars Program was developed in 2004 as the signature scholarship initiative of The Center for Talented Youth. Their mission is to identify high potential 8th grade students from low-income families and from groups traditionally underrepresented in higher education. The full scholarship prepares these students for four years for top levels of academic achievement and leadership through participation in rigorous summer programs, distance education courses, a mentoring program, and academic support provided by a personal educational advisor. Students in grade 9 or higher are not eligible for this scholarship.
About the Study for Exceptional Talent Search:
Go to http://cty.jhu.edu/set/. The Study of Exceptional Talent (SET) was created to help extremely talented students achieve their full potential, and, through its research and advocacy initiatives, to enhance the educational opportunities available for all academically advanced students. Since 1980, SET has assisted students throughout the world who exhibit extraordinary mathematical or verbal reasoning ability by scoring at least 700 on either the Mathematical or Verbal (Critical Reading) part of the SAT before the age of 13 (or score an additional ten points for each additional month of age). One advantage of participating in the SET program is that SET will write a Supplemental letter of recommendation when on behalf of your child when he or she applies to colleges and competitive-admissions high schools and prep schools.
About DUKE TIP:
Go to http://tip.duke.edu/node/284.  Duke TIP Summer Studies Programs are superb academic opportunities and dynamic residential and social experiences for seventh through tenth graders. These three-week sessions are intense and demanding; students are challenged to think critically about themselves and their world. Duke TIP is a global leader in identifying academically gifted students and providing them with opportunities to support their development.  Duke TIP is a nonprofit organization devoted to meeting the academic and social needs of gifted students. Their 4th–6th Grade Talent Search is the entry point for TIP benefits that can motivate gifted students to realize their full potential throughout their school years and beyond. Eligibility for the talent search is an honor. The program is open only to fourth, fifth, or sixth grade students who achieve a qualifying score at or above the 95th percentile on a recent grade-level test.  Participants receive recognition and a variety of benefits to nurture their academic talent, including a unique online curricula, educational resources, access to research-based advice and more. A major benefit is the opportunity to take an above-level test designed by ACT for eighth grade students. Taking this optional test helps younger gifted students clarify their academic abilities and qualifies them to enroll in the 7th Grade Talent Search once they complete the sixth grade. Seventh grade students with strong intellectual abilities are invited to participate if they achieve a qualifying score at or above the 95th percentile on a recent grade-level test. Upon enrollment, Duke TIP registers this select group to take the ACT or the SAT college entrance exam. After participants take their test, we provide valuable benefits to them throughout high school, including access to unique resources for gifted students developed by experts in the field of gifted education. Academically talented students need new challenges, special motivation, and support to help them reach their full potential. Duke TIP helps participants grow scholastically by providing the opportunity for above-level testing, feedback on abilities, educational resources, and encouragement. Enrollment begins August 1 of each year. TIP services are designed to meet the academic needs of gifted students and to encourage the development of their special talents
Course Dates

FALL 2016
Saturday Session
Sunday Session
Class 1
September 10
September 11
Class 2
September 17
September 18
Class 3
September 24
September 25
Class 4
October 1
October 2
Class 5
October 8
October 9
Class 6
October 15
October 16
Class 7
October 22
October 23
Class 8
October 29
October 30
Class 9
November 5
November 6
Class 10
November 12
November 13
Class 11
November 19
November 20
NO CLASS
November 26
(Thanksgiving)
November 27
(Thanksgiving)
Class 12
December 3
December 4
Class 13
December 10
December 11
Class 14
December 17
December 18

SYLLABUS



Class 1: September 10 or 11, 2016

Weekend 1:  

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 1.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Students receive class materials and supplies.   
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test 1 in class.
·         Tutors gather student emails, parent emails, and parent cell phones

Homework after Weekend 1:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 1.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 1.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 1.
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 1. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.

Weekend 2: September 17 or 18, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 2.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  

Homework after Weekend 2:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 2.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 2.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 2.
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 2. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.
·         Harvard Essay Book: Students read and outline essays 1 to 20 in Harvard Essay book. Students are to highlight any descriptive phrases directly in the book as they read these essays.  Students are to read the commentary on the essays and highlight any key points from comments.

Weekend 3: September 24 or 25, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 3.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  


Homework after Weekend 3:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 3.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 3.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 3
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 3. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.
·         Harvard Essay Book: Students read and outline essays 21 to 30 in the Harvard Essay book. Students are to highlight any descriptive phrases directly in the book as they read these essays.  Students are to read the commentary on the essays and highlight any key points.
·         Flashcard challenge: Students create color flashcards of Week 1 to 4 from the vocabulary packet. On side 1, write the word. On side 2 (the flip side) rewrite the definition, which is found in bold letters under the word. After you write the word on one side and then definition on the other, create your own sentence using the word and place that sentence under the definition on side 2. Students must be very neat as they create flashcards. The student with the neatest flashcards and most original sentences receives a prize.


Weekend 4: October 1 or 2, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 4.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  


Homework after Weekend 4:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 4.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 4.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 4.
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 4. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.
·         Harvard Essay Book: Students read and outline essays 31-40 in the Harvard Essay book. Students are to highlight any descriptive phrases directly in the book as they read these essays.  Students are to read the commentary on the essays and highlight any key points.


Weekend 5: October 8 or 9, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 5.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
 

Homework after Weekend 5:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 5.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 5.
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 5. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 5.
·         Harvard Essay Book: Students read and outline essays 41-50 in the Harvard Essay book. Students are to highlight any descriptive phrases directly in the book as they read these essays.  Students are to read the commentary on the essays and highlight any key points.


Weekend 6: October 15 or 16, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 6.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
 

Homework after Weekend 6:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 6.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 6.
·         Essay: Students complete essay homework for Week 6. Students are asked to write at least one essay. They can write up to five. The essay prompts are found at the end of the syllabus.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 6.

Weekend 7: October 22 or 23, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 7.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.
 

Homework after Weekend 7:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 7.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 7.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 7.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 7.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.


Weekend 8: October 29 or 30, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 8.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.   
 

Homework after Weekend 8:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 8.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 8.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 8.
·         Students are now required to write advanced essay per week
·         Flashcard challenge: Students create color flashcards of Weeks 5 to 8 from the vocabulary packet. On side 1, write the word. On side 2 (the flip side) rewrite the definition, which is found in bold letters under the word. After you write the word on one side and then definition on the other, create your own sentence using the word and place that sentence under the definition on side 2. Students must be very neat as they create flashcards. The student with the neatest flashcards and most original sentences receives a prize..   

Weekend 9: November 5 or 6, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 9.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
 

Homework after Weekend 9:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 9.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 9.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 9.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 9.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.


Weekend 10: November 12 or 13, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 10.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
 
Homework after Weekend 10:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 10.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 10.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 10.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 10.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.


·          


Weekend 11: November 19 or 20, 2016

·         Students take Hunter Diagnostic Test 11.
·         Tutors grade and record scores to excel.
·         Tutor goes over Diagnostic Test in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutor goes over reading and math homework in class.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  

Homework after Weekend 11:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 11.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 11.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 11.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 11.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.



NO CLASS: November 26 and 27, 2016 (Thanksgiving)



Weekend 12: December 3 or 4, 2016

·         100% READING DAY: Tutors go over all reading homework from weeks 1-11 and test taking strategies
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework. .
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
 
Homework after Weekend 12:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 12.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 12.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 12.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 12.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.
·         Flashcard challenge: Students create color flashcards of Weeks 9 to 12 from the vocabulary packet. On side 1, write the word. On side 2 (the flip side) rewrite the definition, which is found in bold letters under the word. After you write the word on one side and then definition on the other, create your own sentence using the word and place that sentence under the definition on side 2. Students must be very neat as they create flashcards. The student with the neatest flashcards and most original sentences receives a prize.

Weekend 13: December 10 or 11, 2016

·         100% MATH DAY: Tutors go over all math homework from weeks 1-13 and test taking strategies.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.  
  

Homework after Weekend 13:

·         Math: Students complete Math Packet Week 13.
·         Vocabulary: Students study Vocabulary Words Week 13.
·         Reading: Students complete Hunter Reading Packet Week 13.
·         Essay: Students complete Essay Homework for Week 13.
·         Note: Students are now required to write one advanced essay per week.

Weekend 14: December 17 or 18, 2016

·         100% ESSAY DAY: Tutors go over all essay homework from weeks 1-13 and test taking strategies.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return essay homework.
·         Tutors collect, grade, and return reading and math homework.   
 
Homework after Weekend 14:

·         NONE! Congratulations for completing the 2016 Hunter Prep Course!
·         Please consider registering for Kweller Prep’ winter break crash course.







Tutors can arrange make up sessions with any students who miss a class.
1 missed class = 1 private hour of instruction.
 Please avoid missing the group classes unless absolutely necessary.

Thank you and good luck!















HUNTER ESSAY GRADING RUBRIC  (UP TO TEN POINTS TOTAL)

CRITERIA
3
2
1
Grammar/Spelling (Up to 3 points)
There is excellent and varied sentence structure, the essay flows smoothly with little to no awkwardness, and there are no misspelled words.
There is adequate sentence structure, the essay contains a few sentences that are awkwardly structured, and several words are misspelled.
There is little to no sentence structure, many sentences are structured awkwardly, and numerous words are misspelled. Simple words have spelling errors.
Usage of Vocabulary
(Up to 3 Points)
The writer uses a diverse and advanced vocabulary appropriately and skillfully, uses an excellent overall vocabulary, and almost never misuses words. The vocabulary is clearly at a higher level than the current grade level.
The writer uses a limited advanced vocabulary, one or two words at most, displays an adequate overall vocabulary accurately, and misuses one or two “big” words a few times.
The writer uses no advanced vocabulary, demonstrates a very limited overall vocabulary, and misuses words several times.
Organization of Ideas (Up to 3 Points)
Ideas are well organized, with each new idea having its own paragraph, and are clearly stated in the topic sentence of each paragraph. The main idea is easily found in the introduction, throughout the body and is clearly stated in the conclusion.
Ideas are generally well organized, with each new idea usually having its own paragraph, and are generally stated clearly in the topic sentence of each paragraph. The main idea is found in the introduction but not clearly throughout the body or conclusion.
Ideas are haphazard and are hard to follow, with each new idea usually not having its own paragraph, and are not stated clearly in the topic sentence of each paragraph. The main idea is not found in the introduction, body or conclusion, or is very hard to find.
Essay goes off topic and confuses the reader.
Addresses Prompt (1 Point)


The essay addresses the prompt clearly.
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PACING YOURSELF
HUNTER TEST TIME BREAKDOWN:
Bring a watch to the Hunter Test. Set the watch to 12:00 PM and keep track of your time.
START TEST
1.   10-15 minutes: PLAN YOUR ESSAY. Use the planning page to outline your essay.
2.   45 minutes: Write your essay. Use transition words and phrases, advanced vocabulary, and make sure the essay  flows smoothly.
3.   1 hour: Do the Math section or English section. Do not spend more than 1 hour on either your Math or English section. Remember, you do not need to get every question right. You just need to get enough right to get your essay read. Aim for 75% or more in accuracy.
ü Always hold a pen or pencil in your hand as you READ the critical reading passages. Take notes on the margins as you read. Do not choose your answer unless you can prove your answer based on lines from the passage. You are not reading for fun - you are reading for points.
ü Look for context clues to help you eliminate wrong answer choices and prove the right one. Place an X on the answer choice when you are sure an answer is wrong.
ü Do not sit back as you read. You are not reading to relax. Please sit forward and use the pen or pencil to help you outline the text as you read.
ü If you get nervous, stop and take a deep breath. This is only a test. Please stay calm and focused.
ü When you do your essay homework for Kweller, spend 10 - 15 minutes PLANNING your essay and 45 minutes WRITING. Stay neat and clear. Make sure each sentence connects well with the prior sentence. Use transitions. Do not go off topic.
ü Keep re-reading the essay prompt to remain focused as you plan your essay.


HUNTER COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL EXAM:
HOW TO APPROACH THE ESSAY


Overall Comments:
Format – The essay should be 4-5 paragraphs long; should include: An introduction, 2/3 paragraphs, and a conclusion. REMEMBER THIS ESSAY IS ABOUT YOU, so use “I” instead of you.
            Spatial Awareness – DO NOT cram words closely together, DO NOT space out words too much, DO NOT write too little (leaving many blank lines on the essay), DO NOT write too much (going past the number of line numbers allotted for the essay). Both QUANTITY & QUALITY are equally important for the essay.
            Vocabulary – Use higher-level vocabulary but only if the vocabulary word makes sense to use in the context.  Don’t just use a “big” word for the sake of using a “big” word. You need to actually make sure the word fits into the sentence. Only use higher-level vocabulary that you know the definition of.  SPELL THE WORDS PROPERLY.  Using vocabulary improperly or awkwardly (not the right vocabulary word for the content of the essay) will hurt your essay grade, not help it.
            Contractions – Contractions are shortening words such as “cannot” to can’t.  DO NOT use them because they are too informal. Again stay away from “can’t”; instead use cannot.
            Sensory Details – Use adjectives/adverbs to describe parts of your essay.  The SHOW DON’T TELL method is key.  You need to be descriptive in order to keep the reader engaged, make the reader feel like they are in the essay, experiencing its content rather than just reading it. Know at least 100 adjectives and be comfortable incorporating them into your essay. Hunter is a HUMANITIES based school. The graders spend a lot of time grading the essay.
            Figurative Language – Use similes, metaphors, and idioms in your writing to make it jump out at the reader.  There are 3,000 students taking the exam, and 3,000 essays that teachers may potentially be reading, so make yours stand out from the competition.
            Punctuation – DO NOT use exclamation points or quotation marks.  This is a personal essay-- not a play or story, which means no dialogue.  Kids should especially stay away from drawing any sort of hearts or designs or triple exclamation marks to prove a point (!!!) Watch for semi-colons and commas.  Commas are used to separate 2 related phrases that CANNOT stand-alone if the comma was replaced with a period.  Semi-colons are used to separate 2 related phrases that COULD stand-alone if the semi-colon was replaced with a period.  A semi colon (;) is stronger than a comma (,) but weaker than a period.
            Proof Read – You should be able to reread your essay at least twice during the exam. Look out for awkward, unclear sentences, grammar problems, structure and if or not you have followed the tips given to you by Kweller Prep.



HUNTER ESSAY STRUCTURE:

Intro: This should take up 3-6 sentences

- Must start with a “catchy hook”
                        -Must generalize the topic to a universal audience
- Must answer the essay prompt question
                        -Must NOT let the reader realize that they are reading an essay
                        -Must address the supporting paragraph topics without listing them

Body Paragraphs: Each one should be 7-10 sentences

-Must stay on one SUPPORTING topic; if you start another topic then create a new paragraph
                        -Must refer back to the essay prompt question
                        -Must use the SHOW DON’T TELL method
                        -MUST Use figurative language
-MUST have a clear flow of ideas; Transitions should be smooth from one paragraph to another.
- MUST have topic sentences and a concluding sentence, summing up the paragraph while relating back to the essay topic.
-  DO NOT many use traditional, boring transitions, i.e. for example, in conclusion, one reason is, another reason. Use advanced transitions. They are found at the back of this packet.
-DO NOT be repetitive. Keep the essay interesting and exciting. The reader must stay engaged.
                       
Conclusion: This should take up 3-6 sentences

-Must summarize the introduction WITHOUT repeating the same sentences/phrases used in the introduction
                        -Must answer the essay prompt question again
-Must NOT let the reader realize that this is an essay and that this is the end of it without saying it outright, i.e. DO NOT use the phrase: in conclusion; opt for more advanced transitions.
-Concluding sentence must clearly indicate that this is the end of the essay without saying It outright, i.e. All in all, Christmas is my favorite holiday and I cannot wait for next Christmas to come quickly enough


HUNTER ESSAY TIPS
How to Write a Descriptive Essay
:

Note: These are just TIPS! Not a comprehensive understanding. You need to work on at least 2 dozen practice essays hand-graded by Kweller Prep tutors prior to taking the Hunter College High School Entrance Exam. Reading “Tips” is no substitute for actually writing these essays.
Descriptions can be objective or subjective depending upon the purpose of your essay:
-Objective description focuses on the object itself rather than your personal reactions to it. Here, your purpose is to present a precise, literal picture of your subject.
-Subjective description conveys your personal response to your subject and tries to get your reader to share that response. Here, your purpose is to choose words and phrasing which might indirectly reveal a response to your subject.
Description, in trying indirectly to convey your response, will depend upon figures of speech to sharpen your using subjective language. Simile, metaphor, personification, and allusion are essential tools for crafting subjective description. Description, whether objective or subjective relies upon detail. Your aim in description is not to tell the reader something, but to SHOW it. Whether objective or subjective, you need to select details and words which convey your dominant impression. Your reader should be able to close his or her eyes and “see” your essay come to life.
Structuring the Descriptive Essay:
I.  Arriving at the main idea: What are the details? In what order should the details appear so they support your thesis and narration/story/main idea? Should you move from a specific to a general description of the subject? Should you move from the least important to the most important feature? What is your thesis? Your purpose? Your audience? Specific details are important for the descriptive essay.
II.  Selecting and arranging the details: As you move through the description you must keep aware of your use of descriptive words and work at maintaining the flow of your description. Keep in mind the overall movement of your essay. Tailor it to work with the flow by not focusing description that will distract the reader.
III. Formulating the thesis statement: Your thesis should convey your main idea while it also points in the direction your descriptive essay will take. The sequence of events is an essential consideration in formulating your thesis.
IV. Formatting the Essay: Here, you orient your reader by stating your thesis and by using your main idea details to create a mood in which you will write the descriptive essay.
Body – here, you rely upon interesting details and logical sequencing for events and the use of chronology or transitions to keep your reader connected to the purpose of your essay.


COMMONLY MISSPELLED WORDS
After Weekend 2 Extra-Credit Homework:
Please rewrite each word into your spiral notebook.
Please develop your own mnemonic device/ sentence/ neat way to memorize the way each word is spelled. Use the mnemonics here as examples.
Student with the best mnemonics get a prize!

A

  • acceptable - The suffix pronounced -êbl but sometimes spelled -ible, sometimes -able. Mnemonic example: Just remember to be able to accept any table offered to you and you will spell this word correctly.
  • accidentally - It is no accident that the test for adverbs on -ly is whether they come from an adjective on -al ("accidental" in this case). If so, the -al has to be in the spelling.
  • accommodate - Remember, this word is large enough to accommodate both a double "c" AND a double "m." You can accommodate two sets of C’s and two sets of M’s.
  • acquire - Try to acquire the knowledge that this word and the next began with the prefix ad- but the [d] converts to [c] before [q]. pronounced: AWK-WIRE
  • acquit – “I hate it when the AC Quits in the winter.”
  • a lot - Two words! Hopefully, you won't have to allot a lot of time to this problem. “’A lot’ requites a lot of space.
  • amateur - Amateurs need not be mature: this word ends on the French suffix -eur (the equivalent of English -er). “AMAT is an amateur; he dabbles in everything without being skilled at anything.”
  • apparent - A parent need not be apparent but "apparent" must pay the rent, so remember this word always has the rent. “A parent will apparently sometimes pay the rent for his or her kids while in college.”
  • argument - Let's not argue about the loss of this verb's silent [e] before the suffix -ment. “I won the argument; you lost the E!”
  • atheist - Lord help you remember that this word comprises the prefix a- "not" + the "god" (also in the-ology) + -ist "one who believes." Think: “ A-THE-IST”

B

  • believe - You must believe that [i] usually comes before [e] except after [c] or when it is pronounced like "a" as "neighbor" and "weigh" or "e" as in "their" and "heir." Also take a look at "foreign" below. (The "i-before-e" rule has more exceptions than words it applies to.) “I don’t beLIEve you when you LIE.”
  • bellwether - Often misspelled "bellweather." A wether is a gelded ram, chosen to lead the herd (thus his bell) due to the greater likelihood that he will remain at all times ahead of the ewes.

C

  • calendar - This word has an [e] between two [a]s. The last vowel is [a]. think: “CalenDARlings make it easy to stayorganized:”
  • category - This word is not in a category with "catastrophe" even if it sounds like it: the middle letter is [e]. Think: “catEgory”
  • cemetery - Don't let this one bury you: it ends on -ery nary an -ary in it. You already know it starts on [c], of course. “Just as cemeteries have all dead bodies,  the word cementary had all E’s
  •  changeable - The verb "change" keeps its [e] here to indicate that the [g] is soft, not hard. (That is also why "judgement" is the correct spelling of this word, no matter what anyone says.) think: “ABLE to make CHANGE.”
  • collectible - Another -ible word.  “I love to collect little IBBLES”
  • column - Silent final [e] is commonplace in English but a silent final [n] is not uncommon, especially after [m]. Think: ColumNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
  • committed - If you are committed to correct spelling, you will remember that this word doubles its final [t] from "commit" to "committed." “the M’s and T’s are committed to being together always”
  • conscience - Don't let misspelling this word weigh on your conscience: [ch] spelled "sc" is unusual but legitimate. “CON (with) Science, you can listen to your consecience and make an informed decision.
  • conscientious - Work on your spelling conscientiously and remember this word with [ch] spelled two different ways: "sc" and "ti." English spelling!
  • conscious - Try to be conscious of the "sc" [ch] sound and all the vowels in this word's ending and i-o-u a note of congratulations. Think: ConSSSSSSSSSSSCIOUSSSSSSSSSSSS
  • consensus - The census does not require a consensus, since they are not related.

D

  • definite (ly) - This word definitely sounds as though it ends only on -it, but it carries a silent "e" everywhere it goes. “I definitely didn’t expect the silent E in definitely.”
  • discipline – “If you DIS (insult) someone, you will be DIS-ciplined.

E

  • embarrass (ment) - This one won't embarrass you if you remember it is large enough for a double [r] AND a double [s].
  • equipment - This word is misspelled "equiptment" 22,932 times on the web right now.
  • exhilarate - Remembering that [h] when you spell this word will lift your spirits and if you remember both [a]s, it will be exhilarating!
  • exceed - Remember that this one is -ceed, not -cede. (To exceed all expectations, master the spellings of this word, "precede" and "supersede" below.)
  • existence - No word like this one spelled with an [a] is in existence. This word is a menage a quatre of one [i] with three [e]s.
  • experience - Don't experience the same problem many have with "existence" above in this word: -ence!


COMMONLY MISSPELLED WORDS
After Weekend 3 Extra-Credit Homework:
Please rewrite each word into your spiral notebook.
Please develop your own mnemonic device/ sentence/ neat way to memorize the way each word is spelled. Use the mnemonics here as examples.
Student with the best mnemonics get a prize!
F
  • fiery - The silent "e" on "fire" is also cowardly: it retreats inside the word rather than face the suffix -y.
  • foreign - Here is one of several words that violate the i-before-e rule. (See "believe" above.)
G
  • gauge - You must learn to gauge the positioning of the [a] and [u] in this word. Remember, they are in alphabetical order (though not the [e]).
  • grateful - You should be grateful to know that keeping "great" out of "grateful" is great.
  • guarantee - This word is not spelled like "warranty" even though they are synonyms.
H
  • harass - This word is too small for two double letters but don't let it harass you, just keep the [r]s down to one.
  • height - English reaches the height (not heighth!) of absurdity when it spells "height" and "width" so differently.
  • hierarchy - The i-before-e rule works here, so what is the problem?
  • humorous - Humor us and spell this word "humorous": the [r] is so weak, it needs an [o] on both sides to hold it up.
I
  • ignorance - Don't show your ignorance by spelling this word -ence!
  • immediate - The immediate thing to remember is that this word has a prefix, in- "not" which becomes [m] before [m] (or [b] or [p]). "Not mediate" means direct which is why "immediately" means "directly."
  • independent - Please be independent but not in your spelling of this word. It ends on -ent.
  • indispensable - Knowing that this word ends on -able is indispensable to good writing.
  • inoculate - This one sounds like a shot in the eye. One [n] the eye is enough.
  • intelligence - Using two [l]s in this word and ending it on -ence rather than -ance are marks of . . . you guessed it.
  • its/it's - The apostrophe marks a contraction of "it is." Something that belongs to it is "its."
J
  • jewelry - Sure, sure, it is made by a jeweler but the last [e] in this case flees the scene like a jewel thief. However, if you prefer British spelling, remember to double the [l]: "jeweller," "jewellery." 
  • judgment - Traditionally, the word has been spelled judgment in all forms of the English language. However, the spelling judgement (with e added) largely replaced judgment in the United Kingdom in a non-legal context. In the context of the law, however, judgment is preferred. This spelling change contrasts with other similar spelling changes made in American English, which were rejected in the UK. In the US at least, judgment is still preferred and judgement is considered incorrect by many American style guides.
K
  • kernel (colonel) - There is more than a kernel of truth in the claim that all the vowels in this word are [e]s. So why is the military rank (colonel) pronounced identically?
L
  • leisure - Yet another violator of the i-before-e rule. You can be sure of the spelling of the last syllable but not of the pronunciation.
  • liaison - Another French word throwing us an orthographical curve: a spare [i], just in case. That's an [s], too, that sounds like a [z].
  • library - It may be as enjoyable as a berry patch but that isn't the way it is spelled. That first [r] should be pronounced, too.
  • license - Where does English get the license to use both its letters for the sound [s] in one word?
M
  • maintenance - The main tenants of this word are "main" and "tenance" even though it comes from the verb "maintain."
  • maneuver - Man, the price you pay for borrowing from French is high. This one goes back to French main + oeuvre "hand-work," a spelling better retained in the British spelling, "manoeuvre."
  • medieval - The medieval orthography of English even lays traps for you: everything about the MIDdle Ages is MEDieval or, as the British would write, mediaeval.
  • memento - Why would something to remind of you of a moment be spelled "memento?" Well, it is.
  • millennium - Here is another big word, large enough to hold two double consonants, double [l] and double [n].
  • miniature - Since that [a] is seldom pronounced, it is seldom included in the spelling. This one is a "mini ature;" remember that.
  • minuscule - Since something minuscule is smaller than a miniature, shouldn't they be spelled similarly? Less than cool, or "minus cule."
  • mischievous - This mischievous word holds two traps: [i] before [e] and [o] before [u]. Four of the five vowels in English reside here.
  • misspell - What is more embarrassing than to misspell the name of the problem? Just remember that it is mis + spell and that will spell you the worry about spelling "misspell."
COMMONLY MISSPELLED WORDS
After Weekend 4 Extra-Credit Homework:
Please rewrite each word into your spiral notebook.
Please develop your own mnemonic device/ sentence/ neat way to memorize the way each word is spelled. Use the mnemonics here as examples.
Student with the best mnemonics get a prize!
N
  • neighbor - The word "neighbor" invokes the silent "gh" as well as "ei" sounded as "a" rule. This is fraught with error potential. If you use British spelling, it will cost you another [u]: "neighbour."
  • noticeable - The [e] is noticeably retained in this word to indicate the [c] is "soft," pronounced like [s]. Without the [e], it would be pronounced "hard," like [k], as in "applicable."
O
  • occasionally - Writers occasionally tire of doubling so many consonants and omit one, usually one of the [l]s. Don't you ever do it.
  • occurrence - Remember not only the occurrence of double double consonants in this word, but that the suffix is -ence, not -ance. No reason, just the English language keeping us on our toes.
P
  • pastime - Since a pastime is something you do to pass the time, you would expect a double [s] here. Well, there is only one. The second [s] was slipped through the cracks in English orthography long ago.
  • perseverance - All it takes is perseverance and you, too, can be a (near-) perfect speller. The suffix is -ance for no reason at all.
  • personnel - Funny Story: The assistant Vice-President of Personnel notices that his superior, the VP himself, upon arriving at his desk in the morning opens a small, locked box, smiles, and locks it back again. Some years later when he advanced to that position (inheriting the key), he came to work early one morning to be assured of privacy. Expectantly, he opened the box. In it was a single piece of paper which said: "Two Ns, one L."
  • playwright - Those who play right are right-players, not playwrights. Well, since they write plays, they should be "play-writes," wright right? Rong Wrong. Remember that a play writer in Old English was called a "play worker" and "wright" is from an old form of "work" (wrought iron, etc.)
  • possession - Possession possesses more [s]s than a snake.
  • precede - What follows, succeeds, so what goes before should, what? No, no, no, you are using logic. Nothing confuses English spelling more than common sense. "Succeed" but "precede." Precede combines the Latin words "pre" and "cedere" which means to go before.
  • principal/principle - The spelling principle to remember here is that the school principal is a prince and a pal (despite appearances)--and the same applies to anything of foremost importance, such as a principal principle. A "principle" is a rule. (Thank you, Meghan Cope, for help on this one.)
  • privilege - According to the pronunciation (not "pronounciation"!) of this word, that middle vowel could be anything. Remember: two [i]s + two [e]s in that order.
  • pronunciation - Nouns often differ from the verbs they are derived from. This is one of those. In this case, the pronunciation is different, too, an important clue.
  • publicly - Let me publicly declare the rule (again): if the adverb comes from an adjective ending on -al, you include that ending in the adverb; if not, as here, you don't.
Q
  • questionnaire - The French doing it to us again. Double up on the [n]s in this word and don't forget the silent [e]. Maybe someday we will spell it the English way.
R
  • receive/receipt - I hope you have received the message by now: [i] before [e] except after . . . .
  • recommend - I would recommend you think of this word as the equivalent of commending all over again: re+commend. That would be recommendable.
  • referred - Final consonants are often doubled before suffixes (remit: remitted, remitting). However, this rule applies only to accented syllables ending on [l] and [r], e.g. "rebelled," "referred" but "traveled," "buffered" and not containing a diphthong, e.g. "prevailed," "coiled."
  • reference - Refer to the last mentioned word and also remember to add -ence to the end for the noun.
  • relevant - The relevant factor here is that the word is not "revelant," "revelent," or even "relevent." [l] before [v] and the suffix -ant.
  • restaurant - 'Ey, you! Remember, these two words when you spell "restaurant." They are in the middle of it.
  • rhyme - Actually, "rime" was the correct spelling until 1650. After that, egg-heads began spelling it like "rhythm." Why? No rhyme nor reason other than to make it look like "rhythm."
  • rhythm - This one was borrowed from Greek (and conveniently never returned) so it is spelled the way we spell words borrowed from Greek and conveniently never returned.
COMMONLY MISSPELLED WORDS
After Weekend 5 Extra-Credit Homework:
Please rewrite each word into your spiral notebook.
Please develop your own mnemonic device/ sentence/ neat way to memorize the way each word is spelled. Use the mnemonics here as examples.
Student with the best mnemonics get a prize!
S
  • schedule - If perfecting your spelling is on your schedule, remember the [sk] is spelled as in "school." (If you use British or Canadian pronunciation, why do you pronounce this word [shedyul] but "school," [skul]? That has always puzzled me.)
  • separate - How do you separate the [e]s from the [a]s in this word? Simple: the [e]s surround the [a]s.
  • sergeant - The [a] needed in both syllables of this word has been pushed to the back of the line. Remember that, and the fact that [e] is used in both syllables, and you can write your sergeant without fear of misspelling his rank.
  • supersede - This word supersedes all others in perversity. This is the only English word based on this stem spelled -sede. Supersede combines the Latin words "super" and "sedere" which means to sit above.
T
  • their/they're/there - They're all pronounced the same but spelled differently. Possessive is "their" and the contraction of "they are" is "they're." Everywhere else, it is "there."
  • threshold - This one can push you over the threshold. It looks like a compound "thresh + hold" but it isn't. Two [h]s are enough.
  • twelfth - Even if you omit the [f] in your pronunciation of this word (which you shouldn't do), it is retained in the spelling.
  • tyranny - If you are still resisting the tyranny of English orthography at this point, you must face the problem of [y] inside this word, where it shouldn't be. The guy is a "tyrant" and his problem is "tyranny." (Don't forget to double up on the [n]s, too.)
U
  • until - I will never stop harping on this until this word is spelled with an extra [l] for the last time!
V
  • vacuum - If your head is not a vacuum, remember that the silent [e] on this one married the [u] and joined him inside the word where they are living happily ever since. Well, the evidence is suggestive but not conclusive. Anyway, spell this word with two [u]s and not like "volume."
WXYZ
  • weather - Whether you like the weather or not, you have to write the [a] after the [e] when you spell it.
  • weird - This word is an exception to the rule about [i] before [e] except after...? So, rules can be broken!

Sourced from: http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/spelling-and-word-lists/misspelled.html#7ioGZYXvSH0W8bUX.99.


ESSENTIAL GRAMMAR RULES
After Weekend 6 Extra-Credit Homework: Please recopy these 11 grammar rules.
Create your own example to help you remember the rule.
Be creative and colorful and use the gel pens and highlighters we provide.
Student who completes this assignment with the best effort gets a prize.


1. RULE: To join two independent clauses, use a comma followed by a conjunction, a semicolon alone, or a semicolon followed by a sentence modifier. 
·         WRONG: The delivery boy knew he carried strange cargo, but still ventured off unafraid.
·         RIGHT: The delivery boy knew he carried strange cargo, but he still ventured off unafraid.  
 
2. RULE: Use commas to bracket nonrestrictive phrases, which are not essential to the sentence's meaning.

·         WRONG: The bus driver with her ears tuned to the roar decided to take the grumbling bus on a detour across the football field.
·         RIGHT: The bus driver, her ears tuned to the roar, decided to take the grumbling bus on a detour across the football field.
 
·         WRONG: My window as dirty as it is unleashes the beauty of nature on a snowy morning.
·         RIGHT: My window, as dirty as it is, unleashes the beauty of nature on a snowy morning.
3. RULE: Do not use commas to bracket phrases that are essential to a sentence's meaning.
·         WRONG: The man, who has too many ties, has too few necks.
·         RIGHT: The man­­ who has too many ties has too few necks.
·         WRONG: The cats, with six toes, are a unique attraction of the tour of Hemingway's house.
·         RIGHT: The cats with six toes are a unique attraction of the tour of Hemingway's house.
4. RULE: When beginning a sentence with an introductory phrase, include a comma.
·         WRONG: After buying the five-pound jar of marshmallow spread he set off in search of a bulk portion of peanut butter.
·         RIGHT: After buying the five-pound jar of marshmallow spread, he set off in search of a bulk portion of peanut butter.
·         WRONG: With this he bestows the responsibility of his own happiness on his parents.
·         RIGHT: With this, he bestows the responsibility of his own happiness on his parents.

·         WRONG: As she begins to gain independence it is natural for Greta to regard the idea of dependency as repugnant.
·         RIGHT: As she begins to gain independence, it is natural for Greta to regard the idea of dependency as repugnant.
5. RULE: To indicate possession, end a singular noun with an apostrophe followed by an 's'. Otherwise, the noun's form seems plural.
·         WRONG: Though the lobsters claws were bound, the creature made a threatening gesture as they dropped it in the pot.
·         RIGHT: Though the lobster's claws were bound, the creature made a threatening gesture as they dropped it in the pot.
·         WRONG: In a democracy, anyones vote counts as much as mine.
·         RIGHT: In a democracy, anyone's vote counts as much as mine.
·         WRONG: There is a vast age difference between Victors mother and father.
·         RIGHT: There is a vast age difference between Victor's mother and father.
6. RULE: Use proper punctuation to integrate a quotation into a sentence. If the introductory material is an independent clause, add the quotation after a colon. If the introductory material ends in "thinks," "saying," or some other verb indicating expression, use a comma.
·         WRONG: Tumbling down the hill, Jack yelled: "Oh, no." RIGHT: Tumbling down the hill, Jack yelled, "Oh, no."
·         WRONG: Her letter spoke to him in kind tones, "You never fail to impress me."
RIGHT: Her letter spoke to him in kind tones: "You never fail to impress me."  
·         WRONG: He views the problem as a slight delay or a sickness that will eventually disappear, "how about going back to sleep for a few minutes and forgetting all this nonsense."
·         RIGHT: He views the problem as a slight delay or a sickness that will eventually disappear: "how about going back to sleep for a few minutes and forgetting all this nonsense."



ESSENTIAL GRAMMAR RULES
After Weekend 7 Extra-Credit Homework: Please recopy these 11 grammar rules.
Create your own example to help you remember the rule.
Be creative and colorful and use the gel pens and highlighters we provide.
Student who completes this assignment with the best effort gets a prize.


7. RULE: Make the subject and verb agree with each other, not with a word that comes between them. 
·         WRONG: The Thanksgiving dinner, right down to the beautiful centerpiece, were devoured by the escaped grizzly.
·         RIGHT: The Thanksgiving dinner, right down to the beautiful centerpiece, was devoured by the escaped grizzly.
·         WRONG: The cart, as well as its contents, were gone.
·         RIGHT: The cart, as well as its contents, was gone.

·         WRONG: The girl, along with her classmates, like the new teacher.
·         RIGHT: The girl, along with her classmates, likes the new teacher.
8.  Be sure that a pronoun, a participial phrase, or an appositive refers clearly to the proper subject. 
·         WRONG: Its hump decorated in strings of flowers, the programmer rode the camel through the food court.
·         RIGHT: The programmer rode the camel, its hump decorated in strings of flowers, through the food court.

·         WRONG: Filled with bad gas, he drove his car to Tucson despite the knocking.
·         RIGHT: Although it was filled with bad gas, he drove his car to Tucson despite the knocking.
9. Use parallel construction to make a strong point and create a smooth flow. 
·         WRONG: I was glad to be departing for Australia but I was nervous when I left my apartment. RIGHT: I was glad to be departing for Australia but nervous to be leaving my apartment.
 
·         WRONG: The system excels at tasks such as communicating with other computers, processing records, and mathematical calculations. RIGHT: The system excels at tasks such as communicating with other computers, processing records, and calculating mathematical equations.
10. RULE: Use the active voice unless you specifically need to use the passive. 
·         WRONG: A refund was given to him by the hair regeneration company. RIGHT: The hair regeneration company gave him a refund.
·         WRONG: A good score was achieved by the team.
RIGHT: The team achieved a good score.
·         WRONG: A box of chocolates and a dozen roses were presented to the girl by her boyfriend RIGHT: The boyfriend presented a box of chocolates and a dozen roses to the girl.
11. RULE: Omit unnecessary words.
WRONG: I would like to assert that the author should be considered to be a genius. RIGHT: The author is a genius.  
WRONG: It would be safe to say that Gregory Samsa is not the only character to undergo drastic change.
RIGHT: Gregory Samsa is not the only character in Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis to undergo drastic change.
WRONG: Before going to the supermarket, we made a list of the groceries we needed in order to make the food that we intended to eat for dinner.
RIGHT: Before going to the supermarket, we made a list of groceries that we needed for dinner.
TRANSITIONAL PHRASES
After Weekend 8 Extra-Credit Homework: Please recopy these transitional phrases into your spiral notebook.
Be creative and colorful and use the gel pens and highlighters we provide.
Student who completes this assignment with the best effort gets a prize.


Using transitional words and phrases allows the reader to flow more smoothly from one point to the next. Transitions enhance logical organization and understandability and improve the connections between thoughts. They indicate relations, whether within a sentence, paragraph, or paper. This list illustrates categories of "relationships" between ideas, followed by words and phrases that can make the connections:

Addition: Also, Again, As well as, Besides, Coupled with, Furthermore, In addition, Likewise, Moreover, Similarly.
Consequence: Accordingly, As a result, Consequently, For this reason, For this purpose, Hence, Otherwise, So then, Subsequently, Therefore, Thus, Thereupon, Wherefore ex: Highway traffic came to a stop as a result of an accident that morning.
Contrast and Comparison: Contrast, By the same token, Conversely, Instead, Likewise, On one hand, On the other hand, On the contrary, Rather, similarly, yet, but, however, still, nevertheless, in contrast. Ex: The children were very happy. On the other hand, and perhaps more importantly, their parents were very proactive in providing good care
Direction: Here, There, Beyond, nearly, opposite, under, above, to the left, to the right, in the distance. She scanned the horizon for any sign though in the distance she could not see the surprise coming her way.
Diversion: By the way, Incidentally. Ex: He stumbled upon the nesting pair incidentally found only on this hill.
Emphasis: Above all, Chiefly, With attention to, Especially, Particularly, Singularly. The Quakers gathered each month with attention to deciding the business of their Meeting.
Exception: Aside from, Barring, Beside, Except, Excepting, Excluding, Exclusive of, Other than, Outside of, Save. Ex: Consensus was arrived at by all of the members exclusive of those who could not vote.

Exemplifying: Chiefly, Especially, For instance, In particular, Markedly, Namely, Particularly, Including, Specifically, Such as some friends and I drove up the beautiful coast chiefly to avoid the heat island of the city.
Generalizing: As a rule, As usual, For the most part, Generally, Generally Speaking, Ordinarily, Usually. Ex: There were a few very talented artists in the class, but for the most part the students only wanted to avoid the alternative course.
Illustration: For example, For instance, For one thing, As an illustration, Illustrated with, As an example, In this case, ex: The chapter provided complex sequences and examples illustrated with a very simple schematic diagram.
Similarity: Comparatively, Coupled with, Correspondingly, Identically, Likewise, Similar, Moreover, Together with. Ex: The research was presented in a very dry style though was coupled with examples that made the audience tear up.
Restatement: In essence, In other words, Namely, That is, That is to say, In short, In brief, To put it differently. Ex: In their advertising business, saying things directly was not the rule. That is to say, they tried to convey the message subtly though with creativity.
Sequence: At first, First of all, To begin with, In the first place, At the same time, For now, For the time being, The next step, In time, In turn, Later on, Meanwhile, Next, Then, Soon, In the meantime, Later, While, Earlier, Simultaneously, Afterward, In conclusion, With this in mind, ex: The music had a very retro sound but at the same time incorporated a complex modern rhythm.
Summarizing: After all, All-in-all, All things considered, Briefly, By and large, In any case, In any event, in brief, In conclusion, On the whole, In short, In summary, In the final analysis, In the long run, To sum up, To summarize.
SHOW DON’T TELL
After Weekend 9 Extra-Credit Homework: Please recopy these phrases into your spiral notebook.
Be creative and colorful and use the gel pens and highlighters we provide.
Student who completes this assignment with the best effort gets a prize.

USING “MORE DETAIL” and EXPANDING IDEAS

1.     Little detail: I walked into my first high school class, feeling nervous.
2.     More detail: On September 2nd, at 7:58 a.m., I tiptoed into the first class of my high school career. My stomach churned as my nerves overwhelmed my emotions.
Describing a setting, situation, or event with concrete examples to back up your description. In the following example, the writer talks about his/her hometown in two very different ways.
1.     Little detail: My hometown is a small town in a very rural area. It is very isolated from the more urban areas of New York.
2.     More detail: My hometown, located along the rural stretches of the Columbia River, has a population of 523. 
Speak of broad topics, such as a personal character quality, while offering evidence in support of it. In the following examples, the writer claims to have a strong work ethic, but only in the second example does the writer illustrate this.
1.     Little detail: Throughout my life, I have developed a strong work ethic. There have been many things that have taught me the value of hard work. My parents in particular made sure I developed a strong work ethic as I grew up. Although I used to have little self-discipline, I am now driven by my strong work ethic.
2.     More detail: Beginning in middle school, I was expected to work at my parent’s store during the summer. I stocked shelves, assisted customers, and swept the floor as a full time employee. Those long summer days allowed me to recognize the value of hard work, and gain respect for my parents’ self-discipline. My strong work ethic can be directly credited to those working.

HUNTER  ESSAY HOMEWORK
READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY
You are required to write 1-5 descriptive essays each week for 7 weeks.
Starting week 8, you are to write only 1 advanced essay each week.
 (4 pages double-spaced single-sided pages)
You must write all your essays BY HAND in the spiral notebook we provide.
Please do not hand in messy or sloppy essays.  
Hand in only clean, neat, essays with good handwriting.
Do not lose your spiral notebooks or forget to bring your homework to class.
To help us edit, please DOUBLE SPACE (SKIP LINES).
Only write on ONE SIDE of the paper so we can EDIT your essay in red. DO NOT WRITE ON THE FRONT AND BACK OF ONE PAGE.
Write an essay or tell a story about each topic.
Do not spend more than 45 minutes to 1 hour per essay, which includes drafting time.
You may refer to your vocabulary packets and transition lists as you write these essays.



WEEK 1 ESSAY HOMEWORK
1.    Who is your favorite character from a book and why?
2.    What is the best thing you have ever written?
3.    Describe your best friend.
4.    Who do you admire or respect and why?
5.    If you could do one thing to make the world into a better place, what would it be?
WEEK 2 ESSAY HOMEWORK
6.    Describe your favorite school teacher.
7.    Describe the greatest thing you learned in school.
8.    What is your favorite school subject and why.
9.    Describe what you like the most about New York City.
10. If you could live in another state or country, where would it be and why?
WEEK 3 ESSAY HOMEWORK
11. What is your favorite color? Describe why.
12. Who do you want to be (professionally) when you grow up and why?
13. What mistake did you make that you learned a valuable lesson from?
14. What is the most favorite object you own? Describe its sentimental value to you.
15. Which friend has had the best influence on you? Describe the friend and cite examples.
WEEK 4 ESSAY HOMEWORK
16. Describe the most recent thing you did during your spare time.
17. Describe your favorite animal at the zoo.
18. Have you ever built anything from scratch? Please describe it.
19. Describe a typical Sunday.
20. Where have you travelled recently? What was the trip like?
WEEK 5 ESSAY HOMEWORK
21. What is your favorite activity at the park?
22. What do you wish to get as a birthday gift this year?
23. What do you think is the best invention ever?
24. What was the best movie you ever saw?
25. Describe your favorite character in a book or novel.
WEEK 6 ESSAY HOMEWORK
26. If you could discover a cure to any life-threatening disease,  which one would it be and why?
27. Have you ever owned a pet? If not, which pet do you wish you owned?
28. Describe your favorite piece of clothing.
29. Why do you want to go to Hunter High School?
30. If you could choose any profession (such as becoming a lawyer, doctor, pharmacist, accountant), which one would it be and why?

WEEK 7 ESSAY HOMEWORK
31. If you could give money to any charity, which one would it be any why?
32. Describe the best vacation you ever went on.
33. Describe your dream house.
34. Describe a treasured belonging you carry with you every day.
35. Describe your favorite meal.
YOU ARE NOW ONLY REQUIRED TO WRITE ONLY 1 ESSAY EACH WEEK.
PLEASE IMPRESS US!

WEEK 9 ESSAY HOMEWORK
(Harder essay prompts begin)
Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their identity would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
WEEK 9 ESSAY HOMEWORK
The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?
WEEK 10 ESSAY HOMEWORK
 Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?
WEEK 11 ESSAY HOMEWORK
 Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.
WEEK 12 ESSAY HOMEWORK
 
Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.
WEEK 13 ESSAY HOMEWORK
Why are you drawn to studying at Hunter? Please discuss how your interests and related experiences have influenced your choice to apply to Hunter. Specifically, how will an education from HCHS help you achieve your academic goals?





THANK YOU to the PARENTS, TUTORS, SUPPORT STAFF and the AMAZING CHILDREN who work SO HARD
to make the KWELLER PREP HUNTER program a SUCCESS.
THANK YOU ALL for your patience, hard work, and effort.

Sincerely, The Team at Kweller Prep.
Hunter
CRASH COURSE
WINTER BREAK - NO SCHOOL
Monday, December 26, 2016- Friday, December 30, 2016
Class 1: Monday, December 26
Class 2: Tuesday, December 27
Class 3: Wednesday, December 28
Class 4: Thursday, December 29
Class 5: Friday, December 30


5 days: $500
Morning Session:  8:00 am to 2:00 pm
Afternoon Session: 2:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Parents can choose a reading heavy, math heavy, or essay heavy sessions.
2016 HUNTER CRASH COURSE
payment slip
Parent name: _______________________Parent cell phone: __________________________
Please write your child’s first and last name in the time slot you choose:
Hunter
Crash Course
Morning Option
8:00 am to 2:00 pm
Afternoon Option
2:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Reading Heavy


Math Heavy


Essay Writing Heavy



Course Dates: Monday, December 26, 2016- Friday, December 30, 2016
­­­­Please pay by cash, check or credit card. Payment must be received by December 1st 2016. Tuition is $500. There is no payment plan option.
If paying by check: Please Make Check Payable to “Kweller Prep” and please write parent cell phone in the left-sided memo line of the check.
If paying by credit card:
Credit card number ______________-_________________-______________
expiration date: ______________ CV code: _________________________
zip code: ____________________

The Hunter Entrance Exam is Friday, January 6, 2016