Monday, April 12, 2010

SAT SCORES TO BE RELEASED VIA E MAIL OCT 29!!!

View SAT Scores
To view your scores on the Web, click the View and Send Scores button above and sign in to visit your My SAT after 8 a.m. Eastern Time on or after the dates listed above. From there you can see your entire score history and a history of all score recipients to which you have previously sent scores. Please note that a small number of scores take longer to report and may not be available on the dates listed here.

Once your score report is ready to view, you will see your new scores as well as previous scores. Your report includes all your scores from up to six SAT and six SAT Subject Test dates (but no more than six of each type). If you gave us your high school's code, your high school will also receive your current and previous scores.

Updating Your Score Recipients
You can make changes to your score recipients easily in your My SAT account. When you register, you can send four score reports at no cost. You can change these score recipients until 11:59 PM (EST) on the Monday one week after your scheduled test date.

My SAT Online Score Report
My SAT Online Score Report is the best and fastest way to get your scores. It's available for free to every student who takes the SAT. It's also an easy way to decrease the amount of paper we use (and that you get in the mail), while still providing everything you'd get in a paper score report, and more. All you need is an online College Board account.

My SAT Online Score Report shows you more about how you performed on each section of the SAT. It gives you the types of questions, level of difficulty, and how many in each group of questions you answered correctly, incorrectly, or omitted. Percentile information has also been enhanced to give you better comparisons with other groups of test-takers.

My Online Score Report helps you to:

Understand specifics about how the test is structured and scored, including the writing section and the essay.
Get detailed insights into how you performed on each section of the test, including responses by question type and difficulty.
See how your scores compare to the scores of students in your school, state, and nationally.
Search for the right colleges, majors, and careers based on your scores.
Work on improving your scores on a future test through targeted practice and links to SAT Skills Insight™.
View a printable copy of your actual essay response and see sample essays that received various scores.
Please note: The actual essay images seen by readers for scoring purposes are clearer than the images we can display on our website.

As of May 2009, you will automatically get your SAT scores through My SAT Online Score Report instead of by mail, unless you registered by mail or actively choose to receive paper reports. We thank you in advance for taking part in our efforts to save paper, reduce our carbon footprint, and send less mail.

Send SAT Scores
In addition to the score reports you chose to send when you registered for the SAT, you can send scores to other colleges and scholarship programs for an additional fee. We will report scores that are available and reportable at the time your request is received.

Only score reports from completed and scored tests will be sent. You can only send scores that appear next to test dates on your SAT Status page. Scores from future tests for which you have registered, but have not yet completed, will not be included.
Scores are delivered to the additional colleges and programs requested approximately four weeks after we process your request. Please remember that an additional week may be needed for the score recipients to process your scores, once they receive them.
If you decide to use Score Choice, only those scores from the test dates you choose will be sent. If you decide not to use Score Choice, all available scores will be sent, including those from previous test administrations. You cannot separate scores for the critical reading, mathematics, or writing sections.
Rush reporting is available for an additional fee. Rush scores are sent two business days after your request is received. Be sure to check with the institutions before requesting this service: not all colleges can accept rush reporting.
Remember, most colleges and universities require official score reports sent from the College Board.
Additional Information
Your official score report will be provided to you and your high school, if you included the code, about five weeks after the test. Students who register online and wish to receive a paper score report by mail in addition to the online score report must request it when they register. Students who register by mail will continue to receive paper score reports.

You may also get your SAT scores with Scores by Phone. An additional fee applies.

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/scores.html

SAT Score can Be Hand-Graded

Hand Scoring/Score Verification
Multiple-Choice Hand Score Verification
The multiple-choice sections of all SAT Program tests are machine scanned. The scanning process is subject to careful and systematic quality control to ensure accuracy. The following guidelines are published in our test and practice materials and are given to all test-takers:

Use a No. 2 pencil and a soft eraser. Do not use a pen or mechanical pencil.
Make sure you fill in the entire circle darkly and completely.
If you change your response, erase as completely as possible.
If your marks conform to the published instructions for marking the answer sheet, the scanning and scoring processes, combined with the quality control procedures, are designed to produce an accurate score. However, if you believe the process did not produce an accurate score, you may request a multiple-choice hand score verification. When hand scoring of a multiple-choice score is requested, your entire answer sheet will be manually reviewed-you cannot request verification of scores for a single section on the SAT or a single SAT Subject Test.

IMPORTANT: If your marks did not follow the published guidelines, your scores will not change, and your score verification fee will not be refunded.

If your marks conform to the published instructions for marking the answer sheet, but there was an irregularity in the scanning and/or scoring process, your score may change. In this circumstance, your adjusted score will be automatically reported and your score verification fee will be refunded.

If we can determine that you made an obvious error in filling in the information on the answer sheet (such as, but not limited to, placing your answers in the wrong section of the answer sheet or improperly recording the test identifying code), your score may change. In this situation, your adjusted score will be automatically reported; however, your score verification fee will not be refunded.

Essay Score Verification
For the SAT, our normal scoring process includes an independent scoring of each essay by two qualified readers. If the two readers' scores differ by more than one point, a scoring director will score the essay. This automatic validation ensures the accuracy of the essay scoring process.

If you choose to have your essay score verified, we determine whether there was an error made in the scanning or processing of the essay scores assigned by essay readers. In this circumstance, your adjusted score is automatically reported and your fee is refunded.

IMPORTANT: The verification of essay scores does not include re-reading the essay or an appeal of the essay score. The score verification fee will not be refunded for essays written in pen.

Requesting Score Verification
You can request a multiple-choice hand score verification or essay score verification, or both, up to five months after the test date by calling Customer Service. There is a score verification fee required to cover the costs associated with verifying your scores. If you used a fee waiver to pay SAT registration fees, the score verification fee will be reduced. The reduced fee is available upon request and is provided on the Request for SAT Score Verification form.

We will mail a letter confirming the results of your multiple-choice hand score verification or essay score verification within five weeks after your signed request and payment are received. We will refund your full score verification fee only if the change in scores was due to an irregularity in the scanning and/or scoring process.

IMPORTANT: Multiple-choice hand score verification and/or essay score verification may result in higher or lower scores than the scores first reported. Adjusted scores are FINAL and will be reported to all score recipients.
source: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/scores/handscore.html

When is the BEST TIME to take the SAT ?

When is the BEST TIME to take the SAT ?


I am asked this question regularly, and would like to properly address it. First and foremost, The SAT exam is offered in the following months: October, November, December, January, March, and May and June. With the new Score Choice policy (which is very tricky, and I will elaborate on it in another article), students are informed that they may take the SAT as many times as they’d like and just have to submit the scores they want to the schools they choose.


It is imperative to know that this is not entirely true. Many top schools, such as Georgetown University, do not participate in score choice (see http://uadmissions.georgetown.edu/scorechoicepolicy.cfm. “Georgetown University does NOT participate in the Score Choice option available through the College Board or the similar program through Educational Testing Service (ETS)” and “Georgetown requires that you submit scores from ALL test sittings of the SAT, ACT or SAT Subject Tests.”)



In fact, many top schools want to see ALL student SAT scores, not merely the top ones. Secondly, many college advisors and teachers alike tell students to take the SAT (or ACT) when they are ready. While the person giving such advice may have very good intentions, I have yet to meet students who, with certainty, felt completely “ready” to take a 4 hour long exam bright and early on a Saturday morning. Many students leave the SAT wishing they invested more hours in preparing for the test, mo matter how much they studied in advance.



My advice is, in short, take the SAT (or ACT) at the best time of the year, when the testing curve is in your favor, and when you will get the most bang for your buck point-wise. You should absolutely be extremely well-prepared prior to taking this test, but that does not necessarily mean that you should wait until your senior year of high school to take it.



With that being said, is it true that some months of the year are better than others to take the SAT? The answer is YES.



Hands down, the best time to take the SAT is during junior year of high school (11th Grade). However, prior to actually sitting for the SAT, students should have already taken several proctored exams. Many Kweller Prep Students, in particular those who scored in the (99th percentile), prepared 6 months to 1 year in advance intensively and took approximately 20-40 proctored practice SAT tests under very strict testing conditions at my office.


The other thing to know is that sometimes it pays, really pays, to be a “strategic tester” and to be aware that there are some times of the year that are better than others to take the SAT, and there is more to the test than just being “ready for it.” After all , you could feel ready as late as February of Senior Year, but that may be too late in the college admissions game. Besides, the test isn’t even administered then.



Here’s a month by month breakdown of when to take, or rather when I advise you NOT to take, the SAT:



MAY:



For some reason, the vast majority of high school juniors take the May Administration of the SAT for the first time. I think this is a mistake, for several reasons. First of all, if you take the SAT for the first time in MAY and are later unhappy with your score, you will not be able to re-take the test until at least October of Senior Year. You have to realize that the May SAT scores will not be released until at least 3-4 weeks later, and by that time, it will be too late to sign up for the June SAT as the registration for the test will have passed. (See http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/calenfees.html: The deadline for registering for the June 5th, 2010 SAT is April 29, 2010, one week before the May 2010 SAT will even be given!)



Another reason why taking the SAT in May is not ideal is because the academic school year is particularly demanding during that month. The SAT is not the kind of test you want to take in addition to doing twenty other things; preparing adequately for this exam truly requires much of your undivided attention.



During the month of May, many students take AP (Advanced Placement) exams, IB (International Baccalaureate) exams, (http://www.uhigh.lsu.edu/academics/ib/Exams.pdf), complete term papers, prepare for New York State Regents exams and get ready for school finals, science projects and the like. Talk about having a lot on your plate! It is nearly impossible to adequately prepare for the SAT in May given all this divided attention and many students wind up re-taking the SAT in October of their senior year (so much for senioritis!) because they cannot manage all these significant responsibilities (but then again, who could blame them?).



Over the summer, Kweller Prep students prepared for the upcoming October SAT as many as 5 days a week-- all summer long. Needless to say, this was not their ideal summer break, and a horrible way to spend the last summer before starting their final year of high school.



Last but not least, you should consider the weather as a factor of when to take the SAT. New York finally gets its first taste of springy, sunny weather in May. After several months of bitter cold, the temptation of spending a sunny afternoon outdoors instead of being indoors studying is very great. I say take the test when it’s cold outside; when you are likely to stay indoors and prepare so that you are at your optimal readiness level on test day. In short, if possible, stay away from the idea of making the MAY SAT the first time you will test.



OCTOBER:



Taking the SAT as a senior is flat out painful. Many students get trapped into taking the October SAT in their senior year (as elaborated upon above) because they unknowingly take the May SAT as juniors and, as described earlier, do not receive their scores until it is already TOO LATE to sign up for the June SAT. (See http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/calenfees.html: The deadline for registering for the June 5th, 2010 SAT is April 29, 2010, one week before the May 2010 SAT will even be given.)



I have several bits of advice to offer as to why October is not the optimal time to take the SAT.



First, the SAT is scored on a curve. Now, I am used to taking tests on a curve. I did so throughout college at New York University, and then all throughout Law School at Hofstra. But for many high schoolers, the day they take the SAT will be their first experience of taking a test on a curve, and it’s not pretty.



Curving a test means that your score is rescaled, and during October, the readjustment of scores is NOT tipped in your favor. (see: http://academics.hamilton.edu/biology/smiller/curve.html

“Normalization also requires that overly high scores be adjusted downward for conformity. Either way, data are distorted and some information is lost. Look at some data, then consider all the implications of "grading on a curve’.”



Moreover, almost all students taking the October SAT are seniors and doing well in October will be incredibly harder than at any other times of the year. I had several students score a 2100 or higher during practice tests, but only hit a 2000 for the October SAT because of the rescaled score curve. This is why I firmly believe that a student who would otherwise score a 2000 on the January administration of the SAT would only get as much as an 1850 in October, because of the stiff competition of the curve.



With regards to the weather, boy is it beautiful during the months leading up to October! This means that studying for the SAT throughout the summer will be harder than ever. It takes an incredible amount of discipline to prepare for the SAT when your friends are scheduling beach trips and your families are arranging vacations. Even my most disciplined testers missed a lesson or two throughout the summer, and I couldn’t blame them. After a rigorous junior year of high school, who wouldn’t want to enjoy his or her final summer before senior year?



Furthermore, because nearly all the students taking the October SAT have already taken it at least once before, statistically, their scores are likely to increase, as they have already gone through the initial stress of sitting for the exam for the first time. More prepared testers, pleasant weather, classic senioritis symptoms, and a miserable testing curve are just a few reasons why taking the SAT is October is not optimal. If you can, stay away, or else be prepared to dedicate your summer living at Kweller Intensive SAT Prep.



NOVEMBER:



Taking the SAT senior year is rough, really rough, and I would never advise it unless you have no other choice. The real problem with November testing (and there are many more reasons than just the few stated here) is that students are likely to fall behind with the college application process since the November scores won’t even be released until December. In SAT Land, the early bird truly catches the worm and no student taking the November or December administration of the SAT will be eligible to apply Early Action (EA, which is non-binding) or Early Decision ED (which is binding), since these priority deadlines are usually November 1 or November 15.



The earlier you apply to college, the better, and by taking the SAT so late in the game, you not only hurt your chances for early college admissions, but also for scholarship deadlines too. What’s worse is that the later you apply to college, the later you will hear back from them. Some seniors don’t know where they are accepted until as late as June of senior year (!), and the uncertainty of where you are going to college can be unbearably stressful and frustrating. My assistant, a former Director of Admissions at New York University, informed Kweller Prep students that some schools take as many as 50% of their incoming class from the Early Action and Early Decision pool, and as little as 8% from the regular decision contenders. You want to get into your dream school when the odds are the most in your favor, so make sure not to be a late tester, or else you may regret it.





DECEMBER:



Oye, what a headache it is to take the SAT in December of senior year! With the holidays fast approaching, and my favorite holiday, Thanksgiving, already passed, concentration is harder than ever. Not to mention all the mid-year academic demands—finals, papers, term projects. What’s worse is that the regular decision college deadlines are fast approaching (Cornell’s deadline is January 1).



The December tester not only has to worry about juggling his or her academic demands, college applications, SAT preparedness, but also risks getting locked out from his or her top choices for college because of the fast approaching deadlines. From the other end of the spectrum, the college admissions officers, who usually consist of university faculty members and professors, will be administering their own final exams to their students. Their energy will not have to be redirected into grading their college student’s exams and term papers. This means that the admissions committee will meet more sparsely, which will inevitably hurt a December tester’s chances of getting into his or her dream school.



YES is it true that you hurt your chances of getting into dream school by applying late. The key is to get your application out EARLY. Warn your younger friends!!!! Hundreds of thousands of students from around the country apply to college in bulk, and you have to distinguish yourself. A serious candidate applies early in the game, and college admissions officers both recognize and reward that effort. A student who takes the December SAT will not have his scores released until Christmastime. Colleges are on winter recess and the college admissions committee meets very infrequently at that time. In short, December is not the optimal time to take the SAT.



JANUARY of Junior YEAR:



Well, we have found our winner. There are so many fantastic reasons why January IS the opportune time to take the SAT. The chaos from the winter holidays is over, it’s likely to be icy cold outside, which makes you more likely to stay in and study (hopefully!) rather than go out and shop, the semester has changed, the school curriculum is not nearly as intense as it was, and many students even switch teachers during this time.





THE BEST PART, and I do mean THE BEST part of taking the January SAT as juniors is that the curve is in your favor. This means you will get the most bang for your testing buck. I frequently joke about how my January Testers will take the SAT with room full of 12 year olds. What could possibly be more heavenly than taking the SAT, on a curve, along with a bunch of 7th graders as your main competition?



Why take the SAT in January of junior year? Because you are ahead of the masses, and you can reach your highest score because the curve is in your favor. ETS (the college board) will hate me for saying this: A senior who takes the SAT in October and scores an 1850 could have easily scored as much as a 2000 had she taken the January administration of the SAT and prepared the same way for both exams. See for yourself by check the score reports. Compare the number of questions wrong versus the final score. You can have a higher score in January and still get more wrong. That’s the beauty of the January curve.



Take the SAT when you have the highest chances of doing well, and January optimal testing time because that is precisely when the odds are in your favor. Don’t Delay! You may not have such a golden opportunity again.


Why are so many seventh graders taking the SAT in January? Well, Johns Hopkins University conducts a National Talent Search and seeks out the finest 7th and 8th graders around to see how they will do on the SAT. (See: http://cty.jhu.edu/ts/grades78.html: “CTY, a world leader in gifted education, conducts national and international talent searches to identify, assess, and recognize outstanding academic talent” and “SMPY pioneered the concept of above-grade-level testing of middle school students, using the SAT to identify exceptionally talented mathematical reasoners, then offering rigorous programs for students who exhibit exceptional reasoning ability”) These kids have 90% or higher school averages, and if they perform reasonably well on the SAT, they can be admitted to the John’s Hopkins Summer Program for exceptionally talented youth.


Now, many students should know that a high school average of a 90 or higher does not guarantee an impressive SAT score, which is why it is likely that so many of the middle age students who have exceptional school grades may perform average, or even below average, on test day. January is the best time for a serious high school junior to take the SAT. It’s a golden opportunity, and you will be well ahead of the game.





Timing is everything: This year, the January SAT will be on January 23, 2010. Every other administration of the SAT is given during awful-- and I mean awful-- times of the year. The SAT is almost always administered during the first Saturday of the testing month. In 2008, I tutored a room filled with seniors on October 31st, because the SAT was given on Saturday, November 1. So much for enjoying Halloween! This year, the October SAT was given on Columbus Day weekend. One of my top students from New York had to take the SAT in Florida because her mother planned a family vacation months in advance and had no idea the SAT would be given on a holiday weekend. The luxury of taking the SAT in January is that all the ‘major’ winter holidays have passed.



This year, the timing of the January SAT will be absolutely perfect. The week prior to the January administration of the exam will be Martin Luther King Jr. 3 day weekend, and most students will be home from school. Moreover, many Catholic schools (like St. Francis Prep) have faculty workshops on Friday, January 22 and no students will attend school that day. The days before the SAT are critical, and having two 3 day weekends to prepare is a blessing and a luxury that no other administration of the SAT exam offers.


Sadly, far too few students take the SAT in January of their junior year of high school. I sincerely hope that this article inspires them to change their minds.



MARCH of Junior Year:



This is perhaps the second best time to take the SAT. If you are unhappy with your January scores, you will have ample time to register for the March Administration of the SAT. We are still surrounded by chilly New York weather and you are (hopefully) less likely to go out as you would in July or August.


Furthermore, by taking the SAT in March, you are testing before the MAY and June masses of students, so you are less likely to be taking the SAT in a room filled with your (ever so distracting) friends and classmates. Very few students take the March administration of the SAT. You are less likely to hit traffic, the test center is less likely to be over crowded, and the scores will be released early enough for you to register again in May if needed.



This is why taking the SAT in March of Junior Year is my runner-up.

Taking the SAT in May wins third place.


Good luck navigating the ever so convoluted college admissions process.





Frances Kweller is the founder of Kweller Prep Tutoring and Educational Services in Forest Hills. A lawyer, teacher, tutor, and dreamer, Frances Kweller has prepared hundreds of students to surpass their goals on the SAT and get into their dream colleges. She offers intensive standardized testing tutoring services, college preparation workshops, and strategic advice on the college admissions process. You can reach her at anytime by calling (917) 499 – 3913 or e-mail her at Info@KwellerPrep.com.


* SAT is a registered Trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.

** Article copyright of Kweller Prep Tutoring and Educational Services of Forest Hills, Intense Prep for Intense Kids. All Rights Reserved. See www.Kwellerprep.com for more. Call Today! 1800-631-1757

Sincerely,
Frances Kweller J.D.
Kweller Prep Private Tutoring and Education Consulting Services
Conveniently Located in the Parker Towers
104-40 Queens Blvd. Suite 1E
Forest Hills, NY 11375
fk@kwellerprep.com
www.kwellerprep.com
(917) 499 - 3913
(800) 631-1757

Press Release

The official KwellerPrep Tutoring Press Release!!



http://www.kwellerprep.com/pressrelease.pdf

So you think PSAT's don't matter? THINK AGAIN! over 36 million dollars in College Scholarships

The National Merit® Scholarship Program honors individual students
who show exceptional academic ability and potential for success in rigorous college studies. The program
does not measure the quality or effectiveness of education within a school, system, or state.Semifinalists Named in the 2010 National Merit® Scholarship Program
(Evanston, Illinois) Today officials of National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC)
announced the names of approximately 16,000 Semifinalists in the 55th annual National Merit
Scholarship Program. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to
continue in the competition for some 8,200 National Merit Scholarships, worth more than
$36 million, that will be offered next spring. To be considered for a Merit Scholarship® award,
Semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the Finalist level of the competition.
About 90 percent of the Semifinalists are expected to attain Finalist standing, and approximately
half of the Finalists will win a National Merit Scholarship, earning the Merit Scholar® title.
NMSC, a not-for-profit organization that operates without government assistance, was
established in 1955 specifically to conduct the annual National Merit Scholarship Program.
Scholarships are underwritten by NMSC with its own funds and by approximately 500 business
organizations and higher education institutions that share NMSC’s goals of honoring the
nation’s scholastic champions and encouraging the pursuit of academic excellence.
Note: This press release was distributed to news media
on September 14 with a list of Semifinalists to encourage
public recognition of these outstanding students. The
release is made available here to provide information
about the National Merit Scholarship Program, however
the names of Semifinalists are not posted on this Web site.
Add one
Semifinalists in the 2010 National Merit Scholarship Program
National Merit, Merit Scholarship, and Merit Scholar are federally registered service marks of National Merit Scholarship
Corporation. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of National Merit Scholarship Corporation and the College Board.
Steps in the Competition
More than 1.5 million juniors in about 22,000 high schools entered the 2010 National Merit
Scholarship Program by taking the 2008 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying
Test (PSAT/NMSQT®), which served as an initial screen of program entrants. The nationwide pool
of Semifinalists, which represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors, includes the
highest scoring entrants in each state. The number of Semifinalists in a state is proportional to the
state’s percentage of the national total of graduating seniors.
To become a Finalist, a Semifinalist must have an outstanding academic record
throughout high school, be endorsed and recommended by the high school principal, and earn
SAT scores that confirm the student’s earlier performance on the qualifying test. The Semifinalist
and a high school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, which includes the
student’s essay and information about the Semifinalist’s participation and leadership in school
and community activities.
Approximately 15,000 Semifinalists are expected to advance to the Finalist level and it is
from this group that all National Merit Scholarship winners will be chosen. Merit Scholar designees
are selected on the basis of their skills, accomplishments, and potential for success in rigorous
college studies, without regard to gender, race, ethnic origin, or religious preference.
Merit Scholarship Awards
Three types of National Merit Scholarship awards will be offered in the spring of 2010.
Every Finalist will compete for one of 2,500 National Merit $2500 Scholarships that will be
awarded on a state representational basis. About 1,000 corporate-sponsored scholarships will
be provided by approximately 270 corporations and business organizations for Finalists who
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universities are expected to finance some 4,700 college-sponsored Merit Scholarship awards
for Finalists who will attend the sponsor institution.
National Merit Scholarship winners of 2010 will be announced in four nationwide news
releases beginning in April and concluding in July. These scholarship recipients will join more
than 267,000 other distinguished young people who have earned the Merit Scholar title.

College Scholarships GALORE!

Yes, I DO edit all scholarship applications –in detail-- from START to FINISH prior to submission. The charge is $150 per hour for new students/ $100 per hour for old….. limited spots available. First come first serve.
Good luck!– Frances Kweller (917) 499-3913

Scholarship Award
Provided By:
Anne Frank Center USA, Inc.
Deadline:
January 15, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$10,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.annefrank.com/fileadmin/safa/index.html
Description:
The Spirit of Anne Frank Outstanding Scholarship Award is available to high school seniors who are community leaders and have been accepted to a four-year college. The winning applicant receives a $10,000 scholarship; runners up receive $1,000. The award recognizes students who exemplify the commitment, ideals and courage that Anne Frank represents today.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study

Do Something Awards
Provided By:
Do Something
Deadline:
March 01, 2010
Type of Award:
Grant
Amount:
$100,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.dosomething.org/programs/awards
Description:
Could you use $100,000 to change the world? The Do Something Awards celebrate young people 25 and under who are tackling a problem and changing the world. Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. or Canada. Apply online at www.dosomething.org/awards. Application closes March 1st, 2010. There will be one $100,000 Grant Winner and four $10,000 Grant Winners.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Davidson Fellows Scholarship
Provided By:
Davidson Institute for Talent Development
Deadline:
March 03, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$50,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.davidsongifted.org/Fellows/
Description:
The Davidson Fellows Scholarship is open to students who can demonstrate noteworthy achievements through the creation of a "significant piece of work" aimed at improving the lives of others in the areas of science, technology, mathematics, music, literature, philosophy and outside the box. A "significant piece of work" is defined as an exceptionally creative application of existing knowledge; a new idea with high impact; an innovative solution with broad-range implications; an important advancement that can be replicated and built upon; an interdisciplinary discovery; an exemplary performance; and/or another demonstration of extraordinary accomplishment. You must also be under the age of 18 as of October 1, 2010 and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site to download an application. PLEASE DO NOT contact the sponsor before carefully reviewing the website. Requests for information or applications sent via the U.S. Postal Service will not be honored








Provided By:
John F. Kennedy Library
Deadline:
January 09, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$10,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.jfklibrary.org/Education+and+Public+Programs/Profile+in+Courage+Award/Essay+Contest+for+High+School+Students/
Description:
The John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Essay Contest is open to United States high school students in grades nine through twelve. You must write an original essay of no more than 1,000-words on one of the topics found on the Web site provided.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Essays should be submitted beginning September 1, 2009 and no later than January 9, 2010. Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.




Healthy Lifestyles Scholarship
Provided By:
Stay Fit Ltd.
Deadline:
February 27, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$5,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.fitnessexercises.tv/scholarships.php
Description:
The Healthy Lifestyles Scholarship is open to currently enrolled high school seniors or first-year college students. To be eligible for this award, you must be a U.S. citizen, be under 25 years of age and answer both of the following two essay questions: in under 1000 words, "Why is a healthy lifestyle important in school?" and in under 500 words, describe your career plans, goals and personal ambitions.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
National Peace Essay Contest
Provided By:
United States Institute of Peace
Deadline:
February 01, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$10,000
Awards Available:
53
Website:
http://www.usip.org/ed/npec/topic.html
Description:
The National Peace Essay Contest is open to students who are in grades nine through twelve. You must be attending a public, private or parochial school or participate in a high school correspondence program in any of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, or the U.S. Territories. This essay contest is intended to promote serious discussion among high school students, teachers and national leaders about international peace and conflict resolution today and in the future. You must submit an essay of no more than 1,500 words on the following topic: "The Effectiveness of Nonviolent Civic Action". In order to apply, you must have a sponsor or contest coordinator within your school or community. This person will review essays and act as the key contact between you and the Institute.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the Web site provided for complete instructions and an application.
Davis Scholars Program - Emma Willard School
Provided By:
Emma Willard School
Deadline:
February 01, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$20,000
Awards Available:
6
Website:
http://www.emmawillard.org/admissions/davis/index.php
Description:
The Davis Scholars Program is open to female high school students wishing to attend Emma Willard School in Troy, NY. You must be applying for admission in your sophomore or junior year and demonstrate leadership and service potential to qualify for this award. Upon graduation from Emma Willard, Davis Scholars will then be eligible to receive continued financial support for their undergraduate studies should they enroll at any one of the 89 American colleges and universities participating in the Davis United World College Scholarship Program. International students may also apply.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Anthem Essay Contest
Provided By:
Ayn Rand Institute
Deadline:
March 20, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$2,000
Awards Available:
236
Website:
http://www.aynrand.org/contests/
Description:
The Anthem Essay Contest is open to 8th, 9th and 10th grade students. To be eligible for this award, you must write an essay of no fewer than 600 and no more than 1,200 words on a topic about Ayn Rand's novelette, "Anthem". The winning essay must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of "Anthem". Essays are judged on both style and content. All information necessary to enter the contest is contained on the sponsor's site.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
One entry per student, please. Essay must be submitted by March 20, no later than 11:59 PST. Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information and complete contest guidelines.
Gen and Kelly Tanabe Scholarship
Provided By:
Gen and Kelly Tanabe Scholarship Program
Deadline:
July 31, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$1,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.gkscholarship.com/
Description:
The Gen and Kelly Tanabe Scholarship is open to 9th-12th grade high school students, college students or graduate school students who are legal U.S. residents. Students not currently in school must plan to enroll in a higher education program within 12 months. Students may study any major and attend any college in the U.S. The award may be used for tuition, room and board, books or any related educational expense. A brief personal statement is required.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Nicholas A. Virgilio Memorial Haiku Competition
Provided By:
Haiku Society of America
Deadline:
Varies
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
Varies
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.hsa-haiku.org/virgilioawards/virgilio.htm
Description:
The Nicholas A. Virgilio Memorial Haiku Competition is available to students in grades 7 through 12. You must submit up to three original haiku poems to be eligible for this award.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
NRA Youth Education Summit (Y.E.S.) Grand Scholarship
Provided By:
National Rifle Association, Youth Education Summit
Deadline:
March 01, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$30,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.friendsofnra.org/National.aspx?cid=580
Description:
The Youth Education Summit (Y.E.S.) Grand Scholarship is available to high school sophomores and juniors who attend the seven- day, expense- paid Youth Education Summit in Washington D.C. which will take place July 12- 18. This award is comprised of two parts, rounds one and two. Round one scholarships are awarded at the conclusion of Y.E.S. To be eligible for a round two award, you must develop a portfolio that communicates your experience at the Summit and how it contributed to your personal growth or introduce an NRA program to your community to be considered for this award.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Contest
Provided By:
Association for Women In Mathematics
Deadline:
February 27, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
Varies $1,000- $10,000
Awards Available:
3
Website:
http://www.awm-math.org/biographies/contest.html
Description:
The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) Essay Contest on Biographies of Contemporary Women in Mathematics is open to all students in three categories: grades 6- 8, grades 9- 12, and college undergraduates. Your essay must be primarily based on an interview with a woman currently working in a mathematical career and be approximately 500 to 1000 words in length. The winning essays will be posted on the AWM web page, and the grand prize winner will have his or her essay published in the AWM Newsletter.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study




Sincerely,
Frances Kweller J.D.
Kweller Prep Tutoring and Education Consulting Services
"Intense Prep for Intense Kids"
Regents, SAT and More......


Conveniently located in the Parker Towers
104-40 Queens Blvd. Suite 1E
Forest Hills, NY 11375

Info@KwellerPrep.com
www.KwellerPrep.com
(917) 499 - 3913
(800) 631-1757


More Scholarships....

Someone IS going to get this money, so it might as well be you…….

Big Dig Scholarship
Provided By:
Antique Trade
Deadline:
April 30, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$3,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.antiquetrader.tv/studentscholarship.php
Description:
The Big Dig Scholarship is available to high school seniors who will be entering their first year of college and students who are currently in their first or second year of college. You must submit an essay between 500 and 1000 words that answers the following issue: "In 200 years, one of your relatives is going to be digging in what is now your backyard. They are going to find something that you buried in 2010 and it is going to put any financial worries they have to rest. Your job today is to decide what to bury. Your goal is to find something that will have immense value in the future." In addition, you must be a resident of the United States to qualify for this award.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information
Healthy Lifestyles Scholarship
Provided By:
Stay Fit Ltd.
Deadline:
February 27, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$5,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.fitnessexercises.tv/scholarships.php
Description:
The Healthy Lifestyles Scholarship is open to currently enrolled high school seniors or first-year college students. To be eligible for this award, you must be a U.S. citizen, be under 25 years of age and answer both of the following two essay questions: in under 1000 words, "Why is a healthy lifestyle important in school?" and in under 500 words, describe your career plans, goals and personal ambitions.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Allstate Foundation s Second Annual Keep the Drive High School Journalism Award
Provided By:
Allstate Foundation
Deadline:
March 20, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$3,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.keepthedrive.com/journalist
Description:
The Allstate Foundation (TAF) is calling for high school students to either write an article and have it published in their school newspaper or write and produce a broadcast news segment for their high school news station to help raise awareness about the dangers of texting while driving. Please visit www.KeeptheDrive.com/journalist for the official rules and entry form. Entries will be accepted now through March 20, 2010.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information
Word Nerd High School Essay Contest
Provided By:
Penguin Books
Deadline:
April 15, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$500
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://www.confessionsofawordnerd.com/essay_contest.php
Description:
The Word Nerd High School Essay Contest is open to U.S. students who are currently enrolled in high school. To be eligible for this award, you must write an essay that tells an amusing true story about high school, while weaving in SAT words. Essays must be between 1,500 and 3,000 words, and should incorporate a minimum of 60 SAT words from the vocabulary list of 1,500 SAT words in the back of "Confessions of a High School Word Nerd."
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information

Optimist International Essay Contest
Provided By:
Optimist International
Deadline:
Varies
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$6,000
Awards Available:
3
Website:
http://www.optimist.org/e/visitor/scholarships.cfm
Description:
The Optimist International Essay Contest is open to students who are under the age of 19 as of December 31st of the 2008-2009 school year (December 31st, 2008). To be considered for this award, you must write a 400-500 word essay on the topic, "The Power of Youth" and submit it to your local Optimist Club. Students do not have to be Optimist members to compete. There are 53 District scholarships of $650 awarded each year. Then 3 International winners chosen from the District winners - first place will receive $6,000, second place $3,750 and third place $2,250.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Submission deadlines vary but all Club-level contests run September through February. Students must first enter the contest through their local Optimist Club. For more information on how to apply, please visit the Optimist website.
A Voice for Animals Essay Contest
Provided By:
Humane Education Network
Deadline:
March 31, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$1,000
Awards Available:
11
Website:
http://www.hennet.org/contest
Description:
High School students are invited to enter the Humane Education Network's A Voice for Animals essay contest. To be eligible, you must submit an essay, previously unpublished, which examines either the mistreatment of one animal species or one cause of animal suffering, occurring anywhere in the world, and possible measures to reduce it. The essay must be typed, double-spaced and not exceed 1500 words.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
I Don't Want to Pay for College Scholarship
Provided By:
Cappex.com
Deadline:
March 31, 2010
Type of Award:
Promotion
Amount:
$1,000
Awards Available:
1
Website:
http://www.cappex.com/page/account/quickApplyEntry/fw_FW_98/sc_np
Description:
The I Don't Want to Pay for College Scholarship is available to students planning to attend college. You must be a US citizen and a high school student, GED recipient or current college student. You must demonstrate a strong record of extracurricular, leadership and/or volunteer activities to be eligible for this award.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
Moody's Mega Math Challenge
Provided By:
Moody's Foundation SIAM
Deadline:
February 26, 2010
Type of Award:
Other
Amount:
$100,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://m3challenge.siam.org/
Description:
The M3 Challenge is entirely Internet-based. Each high school may enter up to two teams of three to five junior and/or senior students. No exceptions will be made to allow underclassmen. Students choose which day they wish to work on Challenge weekend and have 14 hours (7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) to solve an open-ended, realistic, applied math-modeling problem focused on a real-world issue. Students attending schools located in the following states and district are eligible to participate: Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, Washington D.C. and West Virginia. All teams must register by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, February 26, 2010.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.

Anthem Essay Contest
Provided By:
Ayn Rand Institute
Deadline:
March 20, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$2,000
Awards Available:
236
Website:
http://www.aynrand.org/contests/
Description:
The Anthem Essay Contest is open to 8th, 9th and 10th grade students. To be eligible for this award, you must write an essay of no fewer than 600 and no more than 1,200 words on a topic about Ayn Rand's novelette, "Anthem". The winning essay must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of "Anthem". Essays are judged on both style and content. All information necessary to enter the contest is contained on the sponsor's site.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
One entry per student, please. Essay must be submitted by March 20, no later than 11:59 PST. Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information and complete contest guidelines.
Fountainhead Essay Contest
Provided By:
Ayn Rand Institute
Deadline:
April 25, 2010
Type of Award:
Essay Contest
Amount:
$10,000
Awards Available:
236
Website:
http://www.aynrand.org/contests
Description:
The Fountainhead Essay Contest is open worldwide to 11th and 12th graders. You must write an essay of no fewer than 800 and no more than 1,600 words on a topic relating to Ayn Rand's novel, "The Fountainhead." Topics can be found on the sponsor's Web site. Essays are judged on both style and content. The winning essay must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of "The Fountainhead." All information necessary to enter the contest is contained on the sponsor's site.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study
Additional Information:
Essays must be submitted by April 25 no later than 11:59 PM, PST. Please visit the sponsor's Web site for additional information.
MonsterCollege $5,000 Giveaway
Provided By:
MonsterCollege
Deadline:
February 28, 2010
Type of Award:
Scholarship
Amount:
$5,000
Awards Available:
Unspecified
Website:
http://college.monster.com/content/5000_spring_promotion_2010?g=1
Description:
The MonsterCollege $5,000 Giveaway is open to registered MonsterCollege members who are legal residents of the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, and who are at least thirteen (13) years of age. You may enter the contest once per day during the Promotion Period.
Applicable Majors:
All Fields of Study

SAT in a DAY

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WARNING about taking *Free* SAT Practice tests sponsored by big test-prep companies

As I say to parents TIME AND TIME again, taking those free tests is a scam. Read the article below. The tests these companies give for *free* are much harder to scare you into taking their course.. the tests GET EASIER as you continue with the courses (like Princeton Review, Ivy Bound, Kaplan, etc…) so you think you are improving thanks to them, when you really are not; you are just taking easier tests along the way. THIS IS WHY I DO NOT give a preliminary exam. Good luck and call me if you have and further questions.

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Source: http://www.thelowell.org/content/view/2702/28/

News Article Title:

Revolution Prep's mock tests' INTEGRITY UNDER FIRE


Students are questioning the validity of a test preparation company’s practice tests, which are offered on campus through the counseling department.

Revolution Prep, LLC is the only test preparation company that has on-campus access to Lowell students. The company conducts mock versions of the College Board’s SAT Reasoning Test and the ACT, and administers them under conditions similar to those of the real tests. After scoring students’ mock exams, Revolution Prep encourages them to enroll in its test prep classes to improve their scores.

This past September, 131 students signed up to take either one or both of the mock tests through Revolution Prep.

Many students have noted wide discrepancies between their scores on the company’s tests and the actual College Board exams, leading some to question whether Revolution Prep’s scores accurately predict real scores.

Fifteen students responded to emails asking them about their experience taking Revolution Prep’s mock SAT last February and the real SAT a few weeks later. None took the company’s classes between the two tests, and all reported mock SAT scores substantially lower than their real ones. Senior Christal Tossany reported the largest gap, with a score 400 points lower on the mock test.

Senior Kenny Ludlow reported scoring 240 points higher on the real SAT a few weeks after taking the mock SAT, without any studying in between. Senior Michelle Agbayani also reported an approximate 200-point difference. Both Ludlow and Agbayani said they didn’t sense the two tests to be dramatically different and could not explain the score differences.

“My difference was about 200 points,” senior Madelyn Low said. “I flipped through the many prep books I have, but there was no real structured study,” she said of the interim time between the two tests.

Revolution Prep regional manager Aaron Peasley defended the test. “I think for the few students who scored higher on the real SAT versus our mock exam, you will find an equal number of students who scored higher on our mock exam than they did on their real SAT,” Peasley said.

However, no students reported receiving higher scores on the mock exam than on the real exam. The Lowell asked approximately 200 students in the Lowell Class of 2009 Facebook Group, which is comprised of both students who took and did not take the mock exams.

Revolution Prep cofounder Jake Neuberg said he has seen this score variation occur with many students. He believes this often happens because students have trouble putting much effort into a test they know will not count. “A lot of times, students just don’t take the test too seriously,” Neuberg said. “That’s probably the number one cause (of score differences).”

Students confirmed that they had not taken the mock test seriously. Senior Nicole Irgens-Moller received a 200-point score difference, but said she had been less mentally prepared for the mock exam. “I had gone to a party the night before so I could have been tired,” Irgens-Moller said.

Ludlow, however, said she took the mock test very seriously. “I treated it like it was the real exam,” she said.

Revolution Prep allows students to keep their test booklets and provides students with an online score report; every question is marked as correct, incorrect, or blank. Using this service, some students discovered that the answers they marked on the test were not the same ones Revolution Prep said they had answered. Senior Courtney Quan said the online results for his mock ACT had different answers from those he had marked, and thus a lower score. “I know which bubbles I marked,” Quan said, “because I circled all the answers (in the booklet) and I checked it after getting my score.”

Neuberg encourages students to call the company in these situations, but said the score discrepancy is usually attributed to two factors. “Either they circle one thing and bubble in the other … or it’s a scanning malfunction,” Neuberg said. “We work with 20,000 students a year, and we’re not perfect. There will be the occasional problem.”

Senior David Wiggins salvaged proof of the score discrepancies. “I took the ACT test and did way worse than I was expecting,” Wiggins said. “But when I looked over the answer key (online), I saw that a lot of the answers I thought I had put were marked as wrong. They also claimed I left a huge number of the questions blank. I was so distrustful of them that when I took the mock SAT, I asked if I could photocopy my answer key before I gave it to them. When I got back the answer key a few weeks later, the difference between my photocopy and what they said I had answered was ridiculous.”

Students also questioned Revolution Prep’s method of calculating scores. Junior Ty Holzschuh, who just received his score report from Revolution Prep, said he was given a 670 out of 800 points on the math section of the mock SAT. His online score report showed that he left one question blank and incorrectly answered four out of the 54 questions. According to the College Board’s scoring guide from the official SAT prep book, Holzschuh would have been given a score in the range of 680 to 740 on the real SAT. In fact, Holzschuh’s scores on each section of the mock SAT were 10 points lower than the lowest score in the College Board’s score range.

Neuberg said that the College Board scores sections of the test differently each time. Depending on the exam’s level of difficulty, a certain percentage of correct answers can result in a range of scores, depending on how well other students do on that SAT administration.

Revolution Prep’s scoring policy may account for some of the discrepancy between mock tests and real test scores. “Because scaling of College Board exams may vary from test to test, it’s impossible to know precisely which number to choose,” Peasley said. “Our rule of thumb has been to choose the middle-to-lower range, so as not to set up students for an unfriendly surprise when they take the actual SAT.”

After receiving low scores on the mock SAT, some students decided not to take the real SAT exam at all. Senior Brianne Taylor was disappointed with her mock SAT score and decided to take neither the prep classes nor the real SAT. “I took the Revolution practice SAT and it discouraged me from taking the real SAT because I thought I’d do badly,” Taylor said.

Neuberg said that Revolution Prep started making its own SAT practice tests after the College Board transitioned to the new SAT in 2005 and stopped releasing tests for companies to purchase. Previously, Revolution Prep had been combining old College Board exams with its own experimental test sections. The company compiled its new mock SAT exam from these self-created experimental sections. According to Neuberg, the company bases all its math questions on real questions from the tests and only changes the numbers used in the questions. However, Revolution Prep’s mock ACT is a real, previously given ACT test.

Neuberg explained that his company field-tested its self-created sections to make the transition to the new SAT. According to Neuburg, Revolution Prep found that students’ scores on these experimental sections, which now make up all of Revolution Prep’s mock SAT tests, were similar to their scores on the old College Board-created sections. Neuberg said that Revolution Prep did many studies to ensure that the tests it created were on par with the College Board’s. Neuberg said he personally checks the quality of the test very often. “I take the tests all the time,” he said.

According to Revolution Prep tutor Sarah Wintermeyer, the company guarantees a 200-point increase from the score on the mock SAT to the score on the real SAT if students take the 6-week class, do all their homework, and take a mock exam every weekend. If students’ scores do not improve, the company will provide them with additional prep sessions.

Some students expressed suspicion over their point differences. “I think this is just Revolution Prep’s way of ensuring their guarantee that your real SAT score will go up by at least 200 points,” Ludlow said. “I’m glad I took it — because it was good practice — but it’s kind of dumb that they feel they need to make their test harder in order for their guarantee to work.”

Low said she sensed a scam after receiving her mock score, but after taking the real exam is now enrolled in the class. “Whether the improvement was due to a harder first test or not, I was just relieved that my actual SAT score was higher than what I had expected after taking the mock exam,” Low said. “But then again, I’m currently enrolled in the Revolution Prep class for the November SATs, so if they did intensify the tests in hopes of pushing insecure college-bound students into their program, I can’t say it didn’t work.”

Agbayani, despite her own speculation that the test wasn’t legitimate, was happy to have the opportunity to take a practice exam. “It’s a possibility that the score I received on the mock SAT wasn’t legitimate, but in the end I think it helped me with time management, so I’m not bothered by anything,” Agbayani said.

More recently, students who took the mock SAT both last February and this September were outraged when they realized that the same test was administered twice. “We remembered all the questions and essay prompts,” senior Ana Billingsley said. When asked, proctors admitted that Revolution Prep had not updated the test materials. “We wouldn’t have bothered taking and paying for it if we had known they reuse the exact same test from year to year,” Billingsley said.

Counselor May Choi has coordinated Lowell’s affiliation with Revolution Prep since last year in order to provide students with an on-campus test prep company. “(Revolution Prep’s services) are at Lincoln, Galileo and Washington already, and my colleagues have found no fault in their programs,” Choi said.

Choi explained that the counseling department has raised enough money from the mock SATs and ACTs to purchase a web-based counseling tool, Naviance. According to Choi, the counseling department is only allotted a $1000 budget each year, but it makes $15 off each mock SAT and ACT test administered, as Revolution Prep gives 100 percent of the proceeds from the mock tests to the school. Assistant principal Holly Giles confirmed that the school gains financially from renting testing rooms to Revolution Prep for its prep classes after school. However, both Choi and Giles asserted that students and parents benefit most from this opportunity.

Despite some students’ dissatisfaction with the mock tests, many attested to the effectiveness of Revolution Prep’s preparatory classes. “Revolution Prep has brought up my scores quite a bit,” an anonymous senior said.
Revolution Prep advertises that it offers its services at a lower price than those of its competitors. “We’re about half the price of any other company,” Wintermeyer said.

SAT Grammar Tips: Common Conundrums by Frances Kweller

SAT Grammar Tips: Common Conundrums by Frances Kweller

Accept: “verb/to agree”: I accept the fact that I must take the SAT.
Except: “Apart From”: I love everything about high school except the SAT!
Effect: “Result”: The effect of studying relentlessly for the SAT will hopefully be the obtaining of a very high score.
Affect: “To Influence”: Kweller Prep SAT affects many people positively.
Fewer: “Countable number”: She scored fewer points than I did on the SAT (because she didn’t go to Kweller Prep).
Less: “not a countable number”: She studies less than I do.
Then: “time”: First you study, and then you pass!
Than: “compare”: She studies more than I do.
To: “place”: I go from home to Kweller Prep tutoring.
Too: “also”: After studying, I make time for fun too.
It’s: “It is”: It’s hard to get a perfect score on the SAT without practice.
Its: “possession”: Despite its complicated questions, the SAT is a coachable test.
Farther: “physical distance”: My home is farther from Alaska than it is from Kweller Prep tutoring.
Further: “a degree”: With Kweller Prep tutoring, you will go further than your friends will in preparing for the SATs.
Could of / should of / would of / might of are INCORRECT. Instead, use could have/should have/would have/might have.
Incorrect: I could of scored higher on my SAT.
Correct: I could have scored higher on my SAT.
Their: “possession” Kweller Prep students score higher on their SAT’s.
They’re: “they are” The SATs are hard, but they’re not impossible.
There: “a location”: You’ll find your practice test over there, on the desk.
Theirs: “possession”: Can you tell your SAT score apart from theirs?
There’s: “there is”: There’s no reason why you can’t get a good SAT score with practice.
That: “restrictive”: The test that you prepare for best will feel the best.
Which: “nonrestrictive, by the way” The SATs, which were always hard for me, seem easy now.
Who: “human” The students who study hard will be pleased with the results!
Who: “subject” Who is going to help you study?
Whom: “object” With whom will you study?
Use subject (I, he, she, we, they) with a linking verb: (to be: am, is, are, was, were, be, been). Don’t use the object (me, him, her, us, them)!
Incorrect: You are more prepared for the SAT than me.
Correct: You are more prepared for the SAT than I (am).
SAT Tips By Frances Kweller, J.D. founder of Kweller Prep SAT, Intense Prep for Intense Kids; visit www.KwellerPrep.com for more or call 1800-631-1757

Karina at Kweller Prep

Karina at Kweller Prep

An awesome YouTube video of Karina, a student attending KwellerPrep being drilled for the SAT.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8hWnDcrcBw

Test Day Reminders

BEFORE TEST DAY

Get organized:

* Know what to bring and what NOT to bring to the test center
http://click.collegeboard.com:8080/44054444.21679.0.13347

Prepare yourself like an athlete:

* Get plenty of sleep the night before the test. Your brain works
better if you're well rested.
* Eat a good breakfast that morning.

ON TEST DAY
http://click.collegeboard.com:8080/44054444.21679.0.13348

Leave your cell phone at home. If your phone rings during testing, it could cost you your scores!

* We strongly advise you not to bring a cell phone or any other
prohibited electronic device to the test center. If your
electronic device makes any noise, or you are seen using it at
any time -- including breaks -- you may be dismissed
immediately, your scores may be canceled, and the device may
be confiscated.

* This policy applies to any prohibited digital and/or electronic
device such as a BlackBerry(R), pager, iPod(R), MP3 player,
camera or other photographic equipment, or separate timers of
any kind.

Check to see if your test center is open.

* Tune in to your local media, like you do for school
closing announcements.

* Check online for a list of test center closings.
http://click.collegeboard.com:8080/44054444.21679.0.13349

Leave early. Get to the test center no later than 7:45 a.m., unless otherwise noted on your Admission Ticket.

Go to the center listed on your Admission Ticket.

* Even if it's not your first choice, you are only guaranteed
admission to the test center on your Admission Ticket.
* You will be charged an extra fee if you go to a different test
center, and a seat may not be available for you.

Arrange your ride home ahead of time. Your testing may end a little before or after the times listed below. If you are testing with extended time, ask the supervisor for approximate finish times.

* For the SAT, plan on being picked up at approximately 12:45 p.m.
* For SAT Subject Tests(TM), plan on being picked up at the
following approximate times:
- 9:45 a.m. for one test
- 11:15 a.m. for two tests
- 12:30 p.m. for three tests

TAKING THE TEST

Keep focused:

* Use breaks to eat or drink any snacks you have brought with you.
* Pace yourself. Each question counts the same. Don't spend too
much time on any one question.

Good luck on test day!

Copyright 2010 The College Board, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, NY 10023-6992.
All rights reserved. View a complete list of College Board trademarks:
http://click.collegeboard.com:8080/44054444.21679.0.102

SAT in a DAY BOOT CAMP!

A FULL day of taking apart a REAL SAT. Instantly increase your score!

SAT in a DAY: A detailed review of all the tips & tricks encoded in a recent REAL SAT examination.

February 12th @ 10am

Monday February 15th @ 10am.

SAT in a DAY Boot Camp will end at approximately 5 PM

Only $199.

Checks (made payable to "Kweller Prep"), cash or money order accepted.

Space is Limited.

Cost Includes All Materials.

Lunch & Refreshments Will Be Provided.

Must RSVP to SATBOOTCAMP@KwellerPrep.com with your phone number and whether you will attend Feb 12 or Feb 15.

Paying for College Just Got Easier

An inspiring story from Fast Web about an amazing scholarship deal.

Stephen Nettnin applied for six scholarships before he found one that stuck. And boy was it a big one!

A sophomore at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate New York, Stephen wasn’t sure he’d win the SMART Scholarship for Service — which he found on Fastweb — when he applied for it. And the process wasn’t an easy one.

The application process took more than three months and multiple interviews.

“There were two phone interviews leading up to becoming a finalist,” Stephen said. “One with the scholarship company and one with a Department of Defense company which is considering the applicant for the scholarship.”

But finally, after months of waiting and being turned down for award after award, he got word — he’d won!

The SMART scholarship paid Stephen’s full tuition and gave him a stipend— that’s roughly $39,000 a year in tuition for three years, plus a $25,000 stipend each year. After graduation, Stephen will work for the Department Of Defense. His assignment? Working in Michigan for an Army contractor.

Stephen said he kept trying for scholarships because he had no other choice — he needed the cash to get through school. “I was motivated by the necessity of funds to continue my education.”

He said he used the stipend for living expenses, but was actually able to put some away for savings too.

Stephen’s advice for students looking for awards? “Apply for as many scholarships as possible, in addition to providing money, scholarships are also excellent resume builders,” he said. “They can change your life.”

And, keep using Fastweb!

“I used Fastweb last year and as a result found a full-ride scholarship that has helped me tremendously,” he said. “Fastweb changed my life”
In his own words:

What did you have to do to be considered for the scholarship?
“Applicants had to write an essay and fill out an online application. They had to be a senior in high school or older maintaining, a 3.0 or higher GPA throughout college. The scholarship is offered for a range of degrees, spanning from Bachelors to PhD.”

What was the interview process like?
“There were two phone interviews leading up to becoming a finalist, one with the scholarship company and one with a Department of Defense company which is considering the applicant for the scholarship. Upon graduation, the recipient is required to work for a Department Of Defense facility for a time equal to the time they received tuition (1:1 service commitment).”

When it comes to the SAT, you have to fight fire with fire....

ETS makes 300 million dollars in profit the year after it made the SAT harder (by adding the writing section and making it a 10 section, nearly 4 hour exam)

Key Dates:
1947: Three testing services merge to form ETS.
1990: SAT is revised; revenues are $300 million in profit.
1993: A computerized version of GRE is introduced.
1999: E-rater software grades GMAT essays.
2001: State-mandated K-12 testing and international markets drive growth.


Company History: Educational Testing Service (ETS) is the world's largest administrator of standardized tests and a leader in educational research. The company develops, administers, and scores achievement, occupational, and admissions tests, such as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) for The College Board, as well as tests for clients in education, government, and business. Through its five regional offices, including one in the Netherlands, ETS annually administers 20 million exams in the United States and 180 other countries.

College for free? Yes, free

A college article from Wallet Pop.

Sweden, Germany, and Venezuela provide free college for their students, so why can't America -- which is, after all, "the land of the free"?

You might think it is not fiscally possible, but this list of 12 free college and university opportunities in the United States proves otherwise.

1. Alice Lloyd College becomes free after financial aid and grants are applied. Students participate in a 160 hour work-study program for a portion of this money. Candidates come from the 108-county area surrounding the Central Appalachian college.
2. Barclay College offers degrees in various ministries and Christian education. This Haviland, Kan., college has offered free tuition to all on-campus, full-time students since fall 2007.

3. Berea College provides free tuition and laptops in exchange for on-campus jobs. This liberal arts college in Kentucky admits students with high academic achievement such as an ACT score between 20 and 30.

4. City University of New York Teacher Academy awards free tuition and internships to students talented in math and science. Research opportunities and teaching experience local in middle and high schools are part of the program. A teaching position in a NYC school follows graduation.

5. College of the Ozarks, affectionately called 'Hard Work U,' allows students a free education in exchange for hard work so they can graduate without debt, and learn character. Apply only if you are in the top half of your graduating class, and have good ACT and SAT scores. Students should also demonstrate financial need.

6. Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City has remained free for 150 years thanks to generous endowments. Of course, you need to get accepted first. Engineering students need a high GPA and SAT score. Art and architecture students must present a portfolio and complete entry projects that test their visual expertise.

7. Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia Penn. offers a free college education for the musically gifted. All accepted graduate and undergrad students receive merit based scholarships that covers tuition. Only 4% of students who audition are accepted.

8. Deep Springs College, in the desert of Inyo County, Ca., on the Nevada border, is a part college, part co-op where men live communally and govern themselves. If you can get into this odd little liberal arts college that admits just 13 young men a year, you won't have to pay a cent for anything. You will, however, need to be a hearty, hands-on, outdoorsy kind of person, as you will take part in running the school's farm. After completing this two-year program, graduates tend to get a free ride from an Ivy League college. The interview process includes ACT or SAT testing, applications, submissions of essays and book lists, transcripts, more essays, and a week-long visit for interviews. The students pick their new classmates.

9. United States Military Academies: Uncle Sam wants you and will pay for 100% of your college expenses if you have what it takes to get into one of its prestigious military academies. These schools include the U.S. Military Academy West Point, U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. In addition to strong academics, students must be nominated by a U.S Senator or Representative, and pass rigorous fitness assessments and medical examinations. The trade off for free college is 5-9 years of service in the military and/or reserves after graduation.

10. University of the People, a new, online, global university only charges modest fees for final exams. Enrolled students access everything online and don't pay for tuition or study materials. They are still working on accreditation for the school, but it looks good. University of the People enjoys steady growth and backing of the United Nations.

11. William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY seeks top students from New York and around the world. High test scores are required to enter this liberal arts college as well as several essays. Students receive a computer, funds for research and internships, and cultural passport to NY entertainment venues.

12. Webb Institute requires all students at this Naval engineering college to complete a double major in Naval architecture and marine engineering. A rigorous high school course of study, high test scores, strength and agility are required for consideration to this program.

Music vs. SAT Scores, Rap Makes Kids Dumb

A controversial article from the Wall Street Journal Blogs.

Books and Music That Make You Dumb

With his two Web sites (which have crashed from too much traffic), Booksthatmakeyoudumb.virgil.gr and Musicthatmakesyoudumb.virgil.gr, Griffith used aggregated Facebook data about the favorite bands and books among students of various colleges and plotted them against the average SAT scores at those schools, creating a tongue-in-cheek statistical look at taste and intelligence.

For example, the favorite musician of the smartest students was Beethoven, with an average SAT score of 1371. Also on the “smart” end of the scale were Sufjan Stevens (1260), Counting Crows (1247), and Radiohead (1220). And sadly for Lil Wayne, enjoying his music was associated with being the dumbest, with an average SAT score of 889.

On the book front, Lolita was favorite tome of the brightest students (a result which Griffith called “charming”), with an average SAT score of 1317. The lowest-scoring students liked the erotica author Zane, with an average score of 980. And strangely, the students who listed their favorite book as “The Bible” were smarter (1047) than those who said it was “The Holy Bible” (980).

Ironically, students who wrote “I don’t read” in the space for favorite books were only slots 14 from the bottom in terms of SAT scores, meaning that there were 13 other favorite books that theoretically made students “dumber” than not reading books at all.

Griffith came up with the idea as a way to show how to take two separate sets of data that were pretty straightforward on their own — in this case, the average SAT score and the favorite books among students at various universities — and combine them to become more interesting. Griffith says, “Their unity is hilarity incarnate. This is to inspire people to think creatively about the data sets that are on the Internet.”

“Of course there is the whole correlation is not causation thing, but, I mean, duh,” he added.

He did find that he had to adjust his measurements and weigh schools according to how populous they were, because small liberal arts colleges were dominating the rankings. For example, Caltech, where he is currently pursuing a doctoral degree, had the highest average SAT score, at 1520, and the school’s favorite band was Radiohead — but with only 913 undergrads, it doesn’t weigh as heavily, as, say, Texas A&M, with more than 35,000 students.

As for his own place on the scale, Griffith’s favorite band is Daft Punk, which didn’t make it onto the list, and his SAT score was “actually fairly low — 1370 out of 1600. I’m actually a little embarrassed by it,” he wrote in an email message, though he then noted, “My GRE was a very acceptable 1490 out of 1600.” The bands that are on the list that he likes? “I actually like Tool a lot, and I see Tool is one of the dumber ones on there. That’s pretty charming.”

Griffith is used to creating controversy, or at least being accused of trying to stir it up — as the founder of WikiScanner, a database that tracks the IP addresses of anonymous Wikipedia editors, he revealed that the CIA, the Vatican, and staff of various members of Congress (among others) had made edits on the site to remove potentially sensitive information.

Don’t Quit, and Don’t Omit, on the New SAT!!!

What is the highest score possible you can earn on the SAT exam? A 2400. That means it’s a perfect score, right? That means you answered every question correctly, right? No way! You can get as many as two questions wrong in every section of the SAT and still get a perfect score. Many students don’t realize this, and sadly, do not achieve anywhere near a 2400 because they employed a testing ‘tip’ that is lethal. The advice to which I refer is the suggestion to omit questions on the SAT, and this decision, if followed, can kill your chances of getting into the school of your dreams.


Do you want a 2400? If so, you’ll have to answer every single question. Don’t be afraid of the “guessing penalty,” which on the SAT means that for every wrong answer chosen, the test taker will lose a quarter point. I encourage you to answer every question. Remember that no one ever got a perfect score on the SAT by answering only 60 percent of the test. The more questions you answer, the higher your chances of hitting a perfect 800 in each section. If you only answer half the test, don’t expect to do better than getting half the score. It’s that simple; leaving questions out on the SAT will gravely endanger your chances of excelling on the SAT, and ultimately hurt your chances of getting into top colleges.
**************************************************

Don’t Quit, and Don’t Omit, on the New SAT!!!

In the previous issue, I stressed that obtaining a perfect score of 2400 on the SAT exam was possible, but that it was imperative to answer every question. I also discussed the “guessing penalty,” which means that for each incorrect answer chosen, the test taker loses a quarter of a point. However, for each correct answer, the test taker gains a whole point on his or her raw score.


It surprises me, then, that many prestigious test prep companies recommend that students skip test questions when they don’t know the exact answer. Following this advice is a recipe for disaster if, you, the test taker needs to earn a perfect score. My advice is that you should at least narrow your choices down, hope for the best, and guess. After all, if you only answer part of the test, don’t expect to do better than obtaining part of the score.

So how does the “Guessing Penalty” affect scores on the SAT? Well, there are approximately 170 questions plus a graded essay. The highest possible score is 2400 which is derived by carefully combining the scores from the reading, writing, and math sections of the test. As explained earlier, for each question answered, the test taker receives one raw point. For each incorrect answer, the test taker loses one quarter point. This loss is infamously known as the “guessing penalty”. For each question that is omitted (not answered at all), the test taker neither loses nor gains any points. The problem is that with this knowledge, many students opt to omit one too many questions because they fear the repercussions of the guessing penalty. However, following the advice to omit is detrimental because it is impossible to score well on the SAT without answering nearly every question.


Here is an easy example to elaborate my point: John prepared with an SAT test prep company whose instructor advised him to skip questions he did not know due to the guessing penalty for picking wrong answers. John doesn’t know the answer to three or four questions in each section. He thinks to himself that this is no big deal. In each section, he’s able to answer over twenty questions. On test day, he leaves the exam room with a grin and eagerly awaits his SAT score. John hopes to get accepted into a super competitive Ivy League college that accepts just of fraction of its applicants. John has a terrific resume: He’s a superior tennis athlete and ranks in the top 50 in the Boys 18s. Furthermore, he’s a member of the National Honor Society in his high school. All he is missing now is a top-notch SAT score and he will be on the road to attending the school of his dreams. Much to John’s dismay, however, he only scored a 1550 total on the new SAT, barely reaching the 50th percentile. “What went wrong?” He ponders.


The testing advice he followed, as previously noted, was a recipe for disaster. John skipped only three to five questions per section, which at the time did not seem like much, but being that there are 10 sections on the SAT, John left out nearly 40 questions, thus lowering his score by as many as 400 points. (Had John gone to Kweller Prep Intensive SAT Tutoring, or any other Extreme SAT preparation center, he would have learned how to tackle the last few ever-so-convoluted questions on each and every section of the new SAT, thus reaching his collegiate goals.) By leaving out nearly 30 percent of the questions on the SAT, John did much more harm to his score than good; while he may have not suffered from the notorious “guessing penalty” on some of the SAT questions, he wound up not getting any points at all for those questions.
The New SAT is a very hard test. Taking the test is a grueling process and it is truly a test of endurance. With 10 sections, one 25 minute essay, and it’s tightly timed format, the New SAT can pose many obstacles for the ambitious college bound student. The test taker needs to learn how to tackle the ever so convoluted last few questions of each section on the test, not to omit them. Again, leaving out the answers is not the solution, so please don’t do it!
Don’t Quit, and Don’t Omit, on the New SAT!!!

**************************************

In the first two articles of this series, I discussed a strategy crucial to obtaining the highest score possible on the SAT exam: you must answer every question on each section of the new SAT test in order to reach your maximum score potential. Let’s take a look at an example of a student who omitted several answers.


One of the girls I tutored for the SAT’s while I was in law school, Kristin, was devastated that she scored a mere 1880 on the New SAT. How could this be? She cried, “I felt like I answered every single question correctly!” The truth was that she did, and after a quick but careful analysis of her SAT score report, I showed her that she got nearly 99 percent of the questions she actually answered right. The problem was that Kristin didn’t answer enough questions to get a higher score. If you don’t answer a question, you neither gain nor lose points. If you guess incorrectly, you lose one quarter point.


Let me make this point excruciatingly clear: There is NO WAY that someone can get an 800 in a section on the SAT without answering or trying to answer every single question. There are exactly 67 questions in the Critical Reading section of the new SAT. Omit just ten questions and the best you can possibly score on the CR will be a 700. Even worse, leave out just ten questions (in total!!!) on the math part of the SAT and your score will drop from a potential 800 to a 660. Omitting merely ten questions on the writing component will drop you down to a 630. By leaving out only two to three questions per section, the highest possible score you can hope for drops from a 2400 to a 1990. So much for “breaking” into a 2000. As I explained this to Kristin, it was as if a light bulb went off; she was now more motivated than ever to try to answer every single question on the SAT correctly. After several months of intensive SAT prep at Kweller, Kristin retook the SAT, answered every question, and scored a 2150. Her score increase did not come easily, but in the end, all her hard work paid off.
Sometimes the truth hurts, but lies hurt much more. The truth is that to excel on the SAT, you have to be able to tackle the last few questions in each and every section of the test. For some, this requires months of intensive preparation. For many, this entails many sacrifices and reprioritizing your time. It is horribly misleading and a terrible mistake to follow the advice that omitting is OK on the SAT. While such a strategy may be beneficial for someone seeking a mediocre SAT score, it is virulent for all others.


Statistically, for every five questions on which you guess, you are bound to get one right. The answers go from A to E, so there is a 20% chance that you will get the question you guessed on correctly. For most students, the odds are even higher, as they have been able to eliminate two to three answer choices before choosing an answer.

Kweller Prep Tutoring: Intense Prep for Intense Kids advises students never to leave questions out on the SAT, despite the fact that so many other test prep companies advise their students to skip the questions they don’t know. Kweller Prep strives to get students to know how to tackle the hard problems on the SAT, not to run away from them. This is perhaps why Kweller Prep students score significantly higher (by 300-400 points) than those who take a generic SAT prep course. Achieving higher scores requires the use of better testing strategies which are carefully designed to maximize one’s SAT score. With that being said, it is imperative that students who seek to score better than average on the SAT not follow such standard test prep advice as it will not allow for a significant increase in their SAT score.

Good luck navigating the ever so convoluted standardized test prep and college admissions process.


Frances Kweller is the founder of Kweller Prep Tutoring and Educational Services in Forest Hills. A lawyer, teacher, tutor, and dreamer, Frances Kweller prepares her students to surpass their goals on the SAT and get into their dream colleges. She offers intensive standardized testing tutoring services, college preparation workshops, and strategic advice on the college admissions process. You can reach her at anytime by calling (917) 499-3913 or sending her an e-mail at Info@KwellerPrep.com or visiting www.KwellerPrep.com


* SAT is a registered Trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.